Kennewick’s Mike Rinker won Grand Champion of WineMaker Magazine’s International Amateur 2015 Wine Competition. Rinker brought home the gold with a red – a 100 percent Red Mountain Cabernet Sauvignon from 2013.

Rinker, who is the father of Northwest Public Radio’s former operations manager Kevin Rinker, told Great Northwest Wine the Northwest’s wine making abilities are  growing.

WSU Wine Science Center to Open in March

Nov 5, 2014
ALSC Architects

Construction for the new Wine Science Center at Washington State University Tri-Cities should be mostly completed this year. A grand opening is planned in March at the $23 million center. Some professors could move in early next year and students could start taking classes next fall. The center is located in the heart of wine country on the WSU Tri-Cities campus in Richland.

Anna King

Wineries across the Northwest are stomping it: They’re harvesting, crushing grapes and making wine full bore.And this year’s fruit looks: Petite and powerful. Correspondent Anna King explains.

There's Much More To Apples Than Meets The Eye

Sep 2, 2014

One of my favorite Far Side cartoons shows four triumphant cavemen with a giant carrot hoisted onto their shoulders, with the caption, "Early vegetarians returning from the kill."

That's kind of what it looks like every autumn weekend when my better half, Dan, comes home from the farmers market with a half-bushel of apples balanced on his shoulder.

Courtney Flatt / EarthFix

When you think of grapes in the Northwest, wine is probably the first thing that comes to mind. But Concord juice grapes actually are Washington’s most widely planted grape. It turns out, juice grapes are more susceptible to warming weather than their wine grape cousins. For EarthFix, Courtney Flatt has more.

Many of the distinct wine grape growing regions in the Northwest are celebrating 30 years since the federal government recognized them as appellations -- or distinct growing areas.

Anna King / Northwest News Network

Northwest wine grape growers expect this week's cold weather to do some damage to their vineyards. But it’s not clear yet how much of next year’s fruit might be affected.

Knock wine off its pedestal. That's the goal of wine expert Richard Betts. And he has come up with a brilliant way to do it: a scratch n' sniff guide to the aromas and flavors of the wine world.

With beautiful illustrations from Wendy MacNaughton, the 10-page board book looks like it belongs with your kid's toys instead of next to The Joy of Cooking.

Dignitaries and leaders of the Northwest wine industry braved a drizzle for a ceremonial groundbreaking Thursday at Washington State University’s new Wine Science Center in the Tri-Cities.

Wine grapes throughout the Northwest are ripening faster this year because of the hot dry summer. Vineyard managers and winemakers are preparing for a breakneck harvest over the next few weeks -- if it stays warm.

This year Eastern Washington had record-setting heat in July, while Oregon had consistently warm weather. Growers throughout the Northwest are hoping for cooler temperatures so the grapes don’t race to ripeness.

The prediction is for more wine, deeper colors and higher alcohol levels.