Matthew Zalewski / Wikimedia Commons

Wildlife managers are euthanizing bighorn sheep in central Washington. A herd has been infected with a disease that causes pneumonia.

SALEM, Ore. - Depending on who you ask, raccoons are either cute little woodland critters or a menace to pets and humans alike. There’s certainly no consensus on that question in the Oregon legislature. One measure in Salem would ban the feeding of raccoons. It’s an idea that’s proven to be surprisingly controversial.

Kristy Neubo has a small dog. She calls it "Baby. She's a little five-pound shih-tzu yorkie mix.

Testimony On Wolf Bill Includes Story Of Attack

Mar 22, 2013

A public hearing Wednesday on a bill to allow people the right to protect livestock and pets from wolf attacks included the story of a very close wolf encounter near the town of Twisp.

Wandering Wolf Returns to Oregon After Year In California

Mar 14, 2013

A wandering male wolf known as OR-7 has crossed back into Oregon after spending more than a year in the mountains of northern California. It was originally born in Northeastern Oregon. Amelia Templeton of EarthFix reports. 

OLYMPIA, Wash. – It would be easier to kill gray wolves that attack livestock or pets under a bill that passed the Washington Senate Friday. Currently, ranchers and property owners can’t kill protected animals, like wolves, without the permission of the Department of Fish and Wildlife. The bill sparked heated debate in the Senate.

Republican state Sen. John Smith said the measure would allow people to defend their animals, including the dog his son loves.

Idaho Adopts New State Water Plan

Mar 8, 2013
Photo by Aaron Kunz / EarthFix

Idaho has a new water plan -- the first update since 1996 to the state’s principles for how water in streams, lakes and aquifers should be divided among users and how it should be conserved for fish and wildlife. The new plan goes into effect Friday. But not everyone is happy about it. EarthFix reporter Aaron Kunz explains.

Relocating An Endangered Deer

Feb 15, 2013
Photo by Wikimedia user Dcoetzee / Wikimedia Commons

A dike in southwestern Washington has become a ticking time bomb. Managers say it’s not a matter of if, but when, it will fail. And behind the dike? A small group of white-tailed deer, considered an endangered species. If biologists can’t move the herd before the dike is breeched, the deer could be wiped out. Courtney Flatt has this report.

Photo by T. Gettelman / Lassen National Forest

The American Marten is a small elusive member of the weasel family. People trap them and sell their pelts on the fur market where they’re known as “sable”. Their numbers are healthy in Canada and some northern parts of the U.S. But scientists worry that marten populations have severely declined in coastal mountain ranges - like the Olympic National Forest.

Ashley Ahearn from our EarthFix team reports on one organization that’s trying to help scientists get some answers.

Photo by Jessica Robinson / Northwest News Network

Washington wildlife managers are working to avoid the kind of escalation in wolf conflicts that led the state to kill an entire wolf pack last fall. Officials from the Department of Fish and Wildlife told a crowd in Spokane Valley Wednesday they’re trying to keep livestock losses down, even as Washington’s wolf population grows. Jessica Robinson has more.

Photo by Jeffrey C. Lewis / Wikimedia Commons

Should wolverines be listed as an endangered species? That will be the question before the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on January 18th. This hardy member of the weasel family is actually making a comeback in the U.S., but perhaps not for long. Ashley Ahearn reports for EarthFix.