wildlife

Cariboo Regional District Emergency Operations Centre

A dam break at a central British Columbia mine could threaten salmon fisheries in the Pacific Northwest.

Beth Waterbury / Idaho Fish and Game

Osprey nests are a common sight near rivers, lakes and bays around here. If you look closely with binoculars, you might notice some of these large raptors like to line their nests with discarded baling twine or fishing line. The problem is it can kill them. Now wildlife biologists are working with ranchers and at boat ramps to keep the attractive nuisance out of the ospreys' clutches. Correspondent Tom Banse reports from Missoula.

Paul Cryan / U.S. Geological Survey

When you think of bats, this guy might be the first thing that comes to mind.

“I am Dracula.”

You may find bats scary. But one group of nature lovers doesn’t. They recently spent a night out tracking bats in central Washington. They wanted to check-in on how bat populations are doing in the state. EarthFix reporter Courtney Flatt has more.

MTSOfan / Flickr

The federal Bureau of Land Management plans to capture and remove fewer wild horses from Western rangelands this summer. An agency statement blames budget constraints and already-full holding pens. Correspondent Tom Banse has more.

Aaron Kunz / EarthFix

It’s back to court for the federal government and salmon advocates. Fish supporters Tuesday once again challenged the government’s plan to manage dams on the Columbia River and protect endangered salmon and steelhead. For EarthFix, Courtney Flatt has more.

Malcolm / Wikimedia

This time of year, young Northwest cougars are getting kicked out of the nest by their mother cats. That means many of these young adults are looking for their own home range. But these rookie hunters are in a cat-crowded field. That sometimes ends in trouble.

Anna King / Northwest News Network

The fate of a natural preserve in southcentral Washington still hangs in the balance. That’s because the City of Richland has plans to build a road through the Amon Creek Wildlands. But community outcry and hours of public testimony might be forcing a change of heart.

Jack Barrie / Wikimedia

Bighorn sheep in the Northwest have their lambs in early spring. About now, those babies start playing together in the mountains. It’s sort of like lamby daycare. But that sweet, social behavior is spreading a deadly disease in several herds throughout the region.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

A plan to poison 3,500 ravens in Idaho won’t proceed this year as state wildlife managers had hoped. The idea is to stop the ravens from eating the eggs of the imperiled sage grouse. Conservation groups call it a ridiculous scheme. An online petition against the plan has received more than 60,000 signatures.

Oregon Landowners Agree To Protect Sage Grouse

May 21, 2014
Pacific Southwest Region U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

One county in Southeastern Oregon has announced one of the largest land conservation agreements in the state to protect greater sage grouse. The birds live in sagebrush country, but their habitat is shrinking because of people, wildfires and invasive species.

Dam421 / Wikimedia

The bears have woken up and once more that’s creating problems around the region. Washington Fish and Wildlife police are recommending that an Ilwaco woman face charges for allegedly feeding wild bears. Wildlife agents have removed seven problematic black bears from her neighborhood and had to euthanize five of them since last fall.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jurvetson/469497187/
Steve Jurvetson / Published on Flickr

The state of Oregon is fining a wildlife sanctuary $5,600 after a cougar attack left its head keeper dead. The incident happened last fall. State inspectors outlined serious safety violations in a report released Monday.

Oregon Zoo

A polar bear at the Oregon Zoo are helping researchers at the U.S. Geological Survey study how climate change is affecting wild Arctic polar bears. For EarthFix, Cassandra Profita reports.

Water struggles in the Klamath Basin are spreading to the Trinity River. Managers at the federal Bureau of Reclamation say by releasing extra water from the Trinity into the Klamath River, they may avoid a fish kill.

Ashley Ahearn

Gumbo and Jambalaya may not be at the top of traditional Northwest menus, but if the invasive red swamp crayfish has its way, that could change. The crayfish – also known as a crawfish or crawdad – is native to the Southeastern U.S. and the Gulf Coast.

But over the past decade this firey-clawed, and delicious, crustacean has moved in on Northwestern lakes. Ashley Ahearn reports for EarthFix.

Graeme Ellis / Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada

The fairy tale ending for a young orphan killer whale keeps getting better. Canadian marine biologists spotted "Springer" the whale with her first calf off the coast of central British Columbia last week. This comes 11 years after Springer was rescued from the ferry lanes near Seattle and successfully reunited with her whale family at the north end of Vancouver Island. Helena Symonds of OrcaLab was one of the whale activists who urged fisheries managers in both countries to intervene at the time.

Ghost Fishing Nets Being Vanquished In Puget Sound

May 21, 2013

Fishing nets are designed to ensnare fish. But when those nets are lost or abandoned at sea, they don’t stop catching fish. Instead, they become ghost nets – floating death traps for the marine life that continue to get trapped in their mesh.

Oregon State University

A plan by the federal government to end protection for gray wolves received mixed reactions from environmental groups to ranchers. EarthFix reporter Aaron Kunz obtained a copy of that draft report and explains what it means for the Northwest.

Oregon State University

The federal government is preparing to stop protecting gray wolves in the lower 48 states, according to a draft document. The plan is drawing criticism from environmental groups. EarthFix reporter Aaron Kunz has more.


canopic / Flickr

Host Intro: The harvesting of a giant Pacific octopus near Alki Beach in Seattle last October prompted a public outcry. Now the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is considering new protections for octopuses. Ashley Ahearn reports for EarthFix.

Matthew Zalewski / Wikimedia Commons

Wildlife managers are euthanizing bighorn sheep in central Washington. A herd has been infected with a disease that causes pneumonia.

SALEM, Ore. - Depending on who you ask, raccoons are either cute little woodland critters or a menace to pets and humans alike. There’s certainly no consensus on that question in the Oregon legislature. One measure in Salem would ban the feeding of raccoons. It’s an idea that’s proven to be surprisingly controversial.

Kristy Neubo has a small dog. She calls it "Baby. She's a little five-pound shih-tzu yorkie mix.

Testimony On Wolf Bill Includes Story Of Attack

Mar 22, 2013

A public hearing Wednesday on a bill to allow people the right to protect livestock and pets from wolf attacks included the story of a very close wolf encounter near the town of Twisp.

Wandering Wolf Returns to Oregon After Year In California

Mar 14, 2013

A wandering male wolf known as OR-7 has crossed back into Oregon after spending more than a year in the mountains of northern California. It was originally born in Northeastern Oregon. Amelia Templeton of EarthFix reports. 

OLYMPIA, Wash. – It would be easier to kill gray wolves that attack livestock or pets under a bill that passed the Washington Senate Friday. Currently, ranchers and property owners can’t kill protected animals, like wolves, without the permission of the Department of Fish and Wildlife. The bill sparked heated debate in the Senate.

Republican state Sen. John Smith said the measure would allow people to defend their animals, including the dog his son loves.

Idaho Adopts New State Water Plan

Mar 8, 2013
Photo by Aaron Kunz / EarthFix

Idaho has a new water plan -- the first update since 1996 to the state’s principles for how water in streams, lakes and aquifers should be divided among users and how it should be conserved for fish and wildlife. The new plan goes into effect Friday. But not everyone is happy about it. EarthFix reporter Aaron Kunz explains.

Relocating An Endangered Deer

Feb 15, 2013
Photo by Wikimedia user Dcoetzee / Wikimedia Commons

A dike in southwestern Washington has become a ticking time bomb. Managers say it’s not a matter of if, but when, it will fail. And behind the dike? A small group of white-tailed deer, considered an endangered species. If biologists can’t move the herd before the dike is breeched, the deer could be wiped out. Courtney Flatt has this report.

Photo by T. Gettelman / Lassen National Forest

The American Marten is a small elusive member of the weasel family. People trap them and sell their pelts on the fur market where they’re known as “sable”. Their numbers are healthy in Canada and some northern parts of the U.S. But scientists worry that marten populations have severely declined in coastal mountain ranges - like the Olympic National Forest.

Ashley Ahearn from our EarthFix team reports on one organization that’s trying to help scientists get some answers.

Photo by Jessica Robinson / Northwest News Network

Washington wildlife managers are working to avoid the kind of escalation in wolf conflicts that led the state to kill an entire wolf pack last fall. Officials from the Department of Fish and Wildlife told a crowd in Spokane Valley Wednesday they’re trying to keep livestock losses down, even as Washington’s wolf population grows. Jessica Robinson has more.

Photo by Jeffrey C. Lewis / Wikimedia Commons

Should wolverines be listed as an endangered species? That will be the question before the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on January 18th. This hardy member of the weasel family is actually making a comeback in the U.S., but perhaps not for long. Ashley Ahearn reports for EarthFix.

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