U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Wildlife experts from Oregon, Washington and California say wolf activity has been increasing in all three states.

River Design Group

Evans Creek is barely a trickle. A dry summer in Southern Oregon means the important salmon and steelhead creek, a tributary of the Rogue River, disappears below the gravel bed in places. Seemingly stagnant isolated pools are all that remain in some areas.

Courtney Flatt / NWPR/EarthFix

Puget Sound steelhead will be heading to an inland Washington lake again this summer. That’s because federal officials are conducting a review of those hatchery programs. The controversy is bringing up a lot of debate about hatchery science in the Northwest.

Cassandra Profita / EarthFix

Wildlife cops have uncovered a problem on the Columbia River. Poachers are catching and killing giant sturgeon. They're driven, in part, by global demand for black market caviar. And they're putting the whole sturgeon population at risk.

Tony Schick / EarthFix

The U.S. is increasing its efforts to combat global wildlife trafficking. But resources have diminished for catching poachers stateside. In Central Oregon, Fish and Wildlife troopers are struggling to protect a mule deer population that’s in decline.

Courtney Flatt / EarthFix



Every year deer and elk lose their antlers. It’s kind of like when a child loses a baby tooth. For some, they’re are fun to collect. But other unscrupulous people are harassing animals to death in an effort grab the biggest antlers.  The trick to looking for antlers is to keep your eyes on the ground.

Rob Manning / OPB

The Northwest’s most iconic bird could get a conservation boost in the coming years.  

On Wednesday the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is announcing it will review the protection status of the Northern Spotted Owl. The result could be an endangered species listing. 


Bluebird skies, warming temperatures, and snow-free terrain might have you itching to hike your favorite trail.

Idaho biologists say the number of wolves is likely declining, but their count of breeding pairs of wolves -- a key number used to measure the health of the state’s wolf population -- has actually gone up.

Denali National Park and Preserve

Idaho biologists say the state’s wolf population likely continued its decline in 2014 -- and that may be because few of them are breeding.