wildlife

Tony Schick / EarthFix

  

The U.S. is increasing its efforts to combat global wildlife trafficking. But resources have diminished for catching poachers stateside. In Central Oregon, Fish and Wildlife troopers are struggling to protect a mule deer population that’s in decline.

Courtney Flatt / EarthFix

 

 

Every year deer and elk lose their antlers. It’s kind of like when a child loses a baby tooth. For some, they’re are fun to collect. But other unscrupulous people are harassing animals to death in an effort grab the biggest antlers.  The trick to looking for antlers is to keep your eyes on the ground.

Rob Manning / OPB

The Northwest’s most iconic bird could get a conservation boost in the coming years.  

On Wednesday the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is announcing it will review the protection status of the Northern Spotted Owl. The result could be an endangered species listing. 

EarthFix

Bluebird skies, warming temperatures, and snow-free terrain might have you itching to hike your favorite trail.

Idaho biologists say the number of wolves is likely declining, but their count of breeding pairs of wolves -- a key number used to measure the health of the state’s wolf population -- has actually gone up.

Denali National Park and Preserve

Idaho biologists say the state’s wolf population likely continued its decline in 2014 -- and that may be because few of them are breeding.

Love The Northwest? So Do Many Ducks

Jan 20, 2015
Earl Blackaby

If you live near water, you probably live near ducks. You've likely seen them... and you've definitely heard them. They can be, well... pretty noisy.

Ken Denton

Hundreds of small, blue-footed seabirds have been washing up dead on Northwest beaches. Scientists are trying to determine the cause.

Sarah Swanson

A bird rarely seen in North America has turned a small bay on the Oregon Coast into a major destination for bird watchers this winter.

Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

Imagine how cool it would be to detect rare or invasive species, study biodiversity or to estimate fish abundance with just a scoop of air or a dip of water. It'd be like science fiction come true. Well, science fiction is indeed becoming reality through a new sampling technology called environmental DNA.

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