David Slater / Flickr

Walla Walla still has a turkey problem. Over the past few weeks, Walla Walla has been home to dozens of large - and aggressive - wild turkeys. More than 30 of the wild birds remain in the city, damaging homes, vehicles, and trees. 

Courtney Flatt / Northwest Public Radio

For federal wildlife enforcement officers, time on the job means a lot of time alone, wandering remote areas. But one wildlife officer now has a new companion to keep him company on the trails: the Pacific Region’s very first enforcement dog.

It has taken five years, but low-copper and copper-free brakes are now available in Washington. That’s because of a 2010 law designed to phase out the use of copper and other toxics in brake pads.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Wildlife experts from Oregon, Washington and California say wolf activity has been increasing in all three states.

River Design Group

Evans Creek is barely a trickle. A dry summer in Southern Oregon means the important salmon and steelhead creek, a tributary of the Rogue River, disappears below the gravel bed in places. Seemingly stagnant isolated pools are all that remain in some areas.

Courtney Flatt / NWPR/EarthFix

Puget Sound steelhead will be heading to an inland Washington lake again this summer. That’s because federal officials are conducting a review of those hatchery programs. The controversy is bringing up a lot of debate about hatchery science in the Northwest.

Cassandra Profita / EarthFix

Wildlife cops have uncovered a problem on the Columbia River. Poachers are catching and killing giant sturgeon. They're driven, in part, by global demand for black market caviar. And they're putting the whole sturgeon population at risk.

Tony Schick / EarthFix

The U.S. is increasing its efforts to combat global wildlife trafficking. But resources have diminished for catching poachers stateside. In Central Oregon, Fish and Wildlife troopers are struggling to protect a mule deer population that’s in decline.

Courtney Flatt / EarthFix



Every year deer and elk lose their antlers. It’s kind of like when a child loses a baby tooth. For some, they’re are fun to collect. But other unscrupulous people are harassing animals to death in an effort grab the biggest antlers.  The trick to looking for antlers is to keep your eyes on the ground.

Rob Manning / OPB

The Northwest’s most iconic bird could get a conservation boost in the coming years.  

On Wednesday the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is announcing it will review the protection status of the Northern Spotted Owl. The result could be an endangered species listing. 


Bluebird skies, warming temperatures, and snow-free terrain might have you itching to hike your favorite trail.

Idaho biologists say the number of wolves is likely declining, but their count of breeding pairs of wolves -- a key number used to measure the health of the state’s wolf population -- has actually gone up.

Denali National Park and Preserve

Idaho biologists say the state’s wolf population likely continued its decline in 2014 -- and that may be because few of them are breeding.

Love The Northwest? So Do Many Ducks

Jan 20, 2015
Earl Blackaby

If you live near water, you probably live near ducks. You've likely seen them... and you've definitely heard them. They can be, well... pretty noisy.

Ken Denton

Hundreds of small, blue-footed seabirds have been washing up dead on Northwest beaches. Scientists are trying to determine the cause.

Sarah Swanson

A bird rarely seen in North America has turned a small bay on the Oregon Coast into a major destination for bird watchers this winter.

Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

Imagine how cool it would be to detect rare or invasive species, study biodiversity or to estimate fish abundance with just a scoop of air or a dip of water. It'd be like science fiction come true. Well, science fiction is indeed becoming reality through a new sampling technology called environmental DNA.

Captain Chad Naugle / ODOC

In a growing number of Northwest prisons, inmates are rearing endangered plants, butterflies, turtles and frogs for release in the wild.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife / U.S. Fish & Wildlife

A new study out of Canada revealed a surprising side effect that hunting may have on wolves.

Researchers wanted to compare the hormone levels in wolves that often deal with hunters’ fire, versus wolves that are hunted very little. They were able to measure levels of progesterone, testosterone, and the stress hormone cortisol by looking at samples of wolf hair from different parts of northern Canada.

It turns out wolves in heavily hunted areas had higher levels of a stress hormone and higher reproductive hormones. So, they were stressed out and mating more frequently.

Conservationists Sue For Wolverine Protections

Oct 14, 2014
Josh More / Flickr

Wolverines need deep snowpack to build their nests and rear their young. But climate models project a rise in temperatures across the wolverine’s current habitat in Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Washington, and Oregon.

Bmaas / flickr

  More of Washington’s bighorn sheep have been infected with bacteria that cause pneumonia. The disease can sometimes wipe out entire herds. Wildlife managers are planning to remove several animals from one herd so that they don’t infect other sheep.

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed endangered species protection for west coast populations of the fisher. It’s a relative of the weasel.

Courtney Flatt / EarthFix

Salmon may soon have a faster way to make it around dams. There’s a new technology that’s helping to transport hatchery fish in Washington. It’s called the salmon cannon — yes, you read that right.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife

The resort town of Ketchum, Idaho is asking the state to back off on killing wolves. They say it’s bad for business. Last night, the Ketchum City Council passed a resolution urging wildlife managers to use non-lethal tactics to control the wolf population.

USDA / Northwest News Network

Four environmental groups say they will sue the government to stop what they call the unlawful killing of wildlife in Idaho. They say tactics like shooting wolves from helicopters, blowing up beaver dams and spraying lethal chemicals in the wild have caused widespread damage.

The groups sent notice that they intend to sue the USDA's Wildlife Services program.

Travis Bruner heads the Hailey, Idaho-based Western Watersheds Project. It's one of the groups that joined the impending lawsuit.

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

The helicopter shooting of a wolf in northeastern Washington didn’t go as planned. A sharp shooter took out the livestock-killing pack’s alpha female. Officials worry that could lower the pack’s chances of survival.

Serge Melki / Flickr

KING 5 reports that a federal contractor hired to kill wolves hunting Washington sheep has accidentally killed the pack's alpha breeding female.

The pack, known as the Huckleberry Pack, has been preying on sheep in northern Stevens County.

Wash. Allows Wolf Kill After Sheep Depredation

Aug 21, 2014
Linda Stanley / Flickr

A rancher in northeastern Washington will be allowed to shoot wolves approaching his sheep herd. State officials made the decision after confirming wolves killed dozens of his sheep.

Alan Vernon / Flickr

Wildfires have ravaged more than 1 million acres across the Northwest. In central Washington, the burned landscape will make it difficult for one of the state’s largest deer herds to find food. Farmers worry the deer would then wander onto their fields. For EarthFix, Courtney Flatt reports.

The Perilous Life Of A Professional Honeybee

Aug 13, 2014
Cassandra Profita / Northwest News Network

The death and disappearance of  bees is raising questions and concerns from Northwest neighborhoods all the way up to the White House. Some attribute bee declines to the use of certain pesticides – especially after chemicals killed thousands of bees in Oregon. But as EarthFix reporter Cassandra Profita explains, researchers are still trying to determine how much of the nation’s bee problem stems from pesticide exposure.