Many Washington and Idaho wheat farmers are struggling this year because of a weird crop problem. Researchers at the USDA’s Western Wheat Quality Lab at Washington State University in Pullman are looking into it.

By baking cakes, cookies, bread, pancakes, noodles and pasta.

In some areas of the Northwest, dryland farmers are getting impatient. They need rain to plant winter wheat.

Anna King

Genetically modified wheat has been found at a university research center in Montana. That news today comes as a federal investigation into a similar case in Oregon concludes with few answers. 

Northwest Wheat Harvest Could Be Down This Summer

Jun 20, 2014
jayneandd / Flickr

Northwest farmers are expected to harvest less wheat this summer. The projections indicate a down year in Oregon, Idaho and Washington.

Who's Ready For Biotech Wheat?

Jul 1, 2013
Grant Gerlock

Most of the corn and soybeans grown in the U.S. are genetically modified. But not wheat. That’s why it was so surprising when Roundup-resistant wheat was discovered in an Oregon field last month. The finding triggered an outcry from food safety advocates and an ongoing investigation by the government. As Grant Gerlock of Harvest Public Media reports, many farmers say they would like biotechnology in wheat to help feed a hungry world, but it’s not what everyone’s hungry for.

The US Department of Agriculture says stalks of genetically modified wheat found in a field in Oregon look to be an isolated incident. In an announcement Friday the agency says its own tests confirm the suspect wheat carries modified genes designed by agribusiness giant Monsanto.

Northwest farmers appear relieved that the government is calling the discovery of genetically modified wheat “a single isolated incident in a single field on a single farm.”

Federal inspectors have taken seed samples from a distributor in Walla Walla, Wash., as part of their investigation to find out how genetically modified wheat wound up in an Oregon field. That’s according to a news report published by the Capital Press.

Agribusiness giant Monsanto says genetically modified wheat found in Oregon could be the result of an accident rather than a widespread planting of the controversial seed. In a call Wednesday morning with reporters, the St. Louis-based company says its provided its specific tests to the U.S. Department of Agriculture for use in the investigation.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has increased the number of investigators and field staff looking into the genetically modified wheat found on an Oregon farm. There are now 15 people on the ground in the Northwest, up from nine last week.

In about a month, Northwest wheat farmers will rev up their tractors for harvest. That means USDA investigators have a limited time to figure out how the genetically modified wheat sprouted up.

Gary Halvorson / Wikimedia Commons

The European Union and Korea have said they will test U.S. shipments of wheat for genetic modification. That’s after last week's report that an unapproved strain of genetically modified wheat developed by Monsanto was found on an Oregon farm.

Washington Wheat Growers React To GMO Discovery

May 31, 2013
Gary Halvorson / Wikimedia Commons

An official with the group that represents Washington state wheat growers does not seem to be too worried about the discovery of genetically modified wheat in a field in Oregon.

Bluemoose / Wikimedia Commons

Japan has temporarily suspended white winter wheat purchases from the Pacific Northwest. The Japanese Ministry of Agriculture announced the move in response to a report that U.S. regulators found genetically modified wheat on an Oregon farm.

Werewombat / Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. Department of Agriculture confirmed today that an Oregon field is contaminated with a genetically modified strain of wheat.

A possible strike at Northwest grain terminals would have a profound effect on U.S. wheat exports. Longshoreman in Portland are in tense labor negotiations that could affect six grain terminals including Portland, Vancouver and Puget Sound.

Most of us may be enjoying the fall sunshine, but Northwest wheat farmers are instead wishing for a little rain. Correspondent Anna King caught up with one Northwest wheat grower in the vast Horse Heaven Hills near Prosser, Washington.

Victory Over The Angel Of Death

Jun 15, 2012
Photo courtesy Washington State University

In a 1789 letter, Benjamin Franklin wrote: "In this world, nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes." Well, it should interest you to know that death is no longer a certainty, at least for one species. The Rock Doc, Dr. Kirsten Peters, has the details.

"The gene for death has been isolated –and reversed- by scientists. Not a bad day’s work, you might say.

Sorry, it’s not the death of human beings that’s at issue. But it is a gene for death that’s embedded in a plant on which we all directly depend each day. And that’s good enough to be plenty encouraging.

Since 1978, one eastern Washington county has out-produced all other wheat-growing counties in the U.S. But what to do with all the leftover straw? Reporting for EarthFix, Courtney Flatt explains a group of students at Washington State University has found a way to provide power from farmers’ scraps.

Rock Doc: Our Daily Bread In 2050

Apr 26, 2012
Washington State University

One of my habits in recent years has been studying climate history in my free time. What can I say; it keeps me out of bars.

Recently, I was startled to learn that the temperatures experienced by American wheat farms back in the 1830s were almost 7 degrees warmer than they now are.