Washington

Rowan Moore Gerety / Northwest Public Radio

For some schools, the most basic task is getting students through the door. One school district on the Yakama Nation Reservation learned the hard way that punishment wouldn't fix its attendance problem. Now, administrators are trying a friendlier strategy to get students to school.

Principal Joey Castilleja is manning White Swan High School’s newly christened Welcome Room, alternating between good-natured jokes and asking students why they’re coming late to school.

Freedom could be just weeks away for the youngest person in the U.S. sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole.

Austin Jenkins / Northwest News Network

We’ve been reporting on students who are sent to juvenile detention for skipping school and other non-criminal behavior. Nationally, there’s a push to outlaw incarceration for these youth and use alternatives. But some judges are reluctant to give detention up.

On a recent morning, Judge David Edwards presides over Grays Harbor County truancy court.

“You have two F's, two incompletes because of missing work,” Edawrds said.

The first time a judge sent Marquise-Unique Travon Flynn to juvenile detention he was in fifth grade. He had one goal: not to cry in front of the other kids in the courtroom.

A new statistic from Washington state illustrates a problem 911 dispatch centers throughout the Northwest grapple with. About a third of 911 calls in Washington state are mistaken.

Democrats in the Washington state House have passed a $12 per hour minimum wage measure. The increase would phase-in over four years.

Skipping school is not a crime in Washington state, but it can still land a student behind bars.

The (Not So) Secret World Of Northwest Curling

Mar 3, 2015
Peter Miller / Flickr

Curling: it's that sport with the stones and the brooms. You might have seen it played at the Olympics. Canadians play it. For many Americans, that's the extent of our curling knowledge. So this video might help bring everyone up to speed:

So that's curling. It's a little bit hockey, a little bit bowling, a little bit shuffleboard.

Washington, Oregon and Idaho are trying to figure out how to keep their state driver’s licenses from becoming obsolete in the eyes of the federal government.

Paul Eggert / Wikimedia Commons

It's about time... daylight saving time, to be precise. Some Oregon and Washington legislators want to end the yearly practice of springing forward and falling back.

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