Washington

Elaine Thompson / Associated Press

Growing marijuana indoors requires a lot of energy -- lights to speed up plant growth, dehumidifiers, heating and cooling equipment. Could sustainable outdoor farms be a more environmentally responsible alternative? A group of Washington marijuana growers say yes.

Several workers sit around a  white table in a small room on a marijuana farm in Goldendale, Washington. They’ve got scissors in hand, scales set to carefully measure out grams.

“I am weighing out some weed," said one of the workers. "Yesterday was an 18 hour day trying to get an order out.”

Benjamin Chun / Flickr

The top education official in Washington State said teachers could face investigation and schools could lose funding - if the number of students refusing standardized tests keeps rising. 

Washington superintendent Randy Dorn doesn't like the phrase "opt-out."

"It's really a refusal to take an assessment that's required by the federal government," Dorn said.

He said low participation rates could cost schools federal money.

Across the Northwest, farmers are already making tough calls because of this year’s drought. The dismal snowpack is to blame.

Rowan Moore Gerety / Northwest News Network

The region's recent stretch of warm weather means Northwest sweet cherries will likely be going early to market this year.

Rowan Moore Gerety / Northwest Public Radio

For some schools, the most basic task is getting students through the door. One school district on the Yakama Nation Reservation learned the hard way that punishment wouldn't fix its attendance problem. Now, administrators are trying a friendlier strategy to get students to school.

Principal Joey Castilleja is manning White Swan High School’s newly christened Welcome Room, alternating between good-natured jokes and asking students why they’re coming late to school.

Freedom could be just weeks away for the youngest person in the U.S. sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole.

Austin Jenkins / Northwest News Network

We’ve been reporting on students who are sent to juvenile detention for skipping school and other non-criminal behavior. Nationally, there’s a push to outlaw incarceration for these youth and use alternatives. But some judges are reluctant to give detention up.

On a recent morning, Judge David Edwards presides over Grays Harbor County truancy court.

“You have two F's, two incompletes because of missing work,” Edawrds said.

The first time a judge sent Marquise-Unique Travon Flynn to juvenile detention he was in fifth grade. He had one goal: not to cry in front of the other kids in the courtroom.

A new statistic from Washington state illustrates a problem 911 dispatch centers throughout the Northwest grapple with. About a third of 911 calls in Washington state are mistaken.

Pages