warm waters

KEN BALCOMB CENTER FOR WHALE RESEARCH

River levels around the Northwest are dropping as the drought continues - and the water’s getting warmer.

That’s a problem for salmon.

Wildlife managers in Washington and Oregon have limited fishing to certain times of day and closed some rivers altogether.

But some say that’s not enough to help struggling fish.

It’s really quiet in the fishing gear aisle at Swain’s General Store in Port Angeles.

Warm Waters Prompt Federal Measures For Migrating Fish

Jul 14, 2015
Rex Parker / Wikicommons

 

 

Unusually warm waters in the Columbia River Basin have prompted federal officials to invoke measures to help migrating fish survive the hostile conditions.

A federal plan to protect endangered salmon and steelhead has contingencies for drier, warmer years. That includes the release of cooler water from upstream reservoirs.

So far, extra water has been released from reservoirs in Canada, Montana, and Lake Roosevelt in Washington.

Bureau of Land Management Oregon and Washington

Federal hatchery managers are keeping an eye on warming river water as temperatures continue to rise throughout the Pacific Northwest.