Oregon says it's making strides in finding housing for homeless veterans and just announced funding for two new housing projects for vets.

Patricia Murphy / KUOW

Four years after the repeal of Don't Ask Don't Tell, the Department of Defense is preparing to lift the ban on transgender service in the military.

Last summer Secretary of Defense Ash Carter formed a working group to study the particulars of what needs to be done to move forward.

As the Pentagon considers the change, practically speaking transgender service members have to walk a fine line between regulations and their identity.

A new national study released this week indicates a shift in thinking when it comes to mental health. A majority of those surveyed say they value mental health and physical health equally. But Idaho remains one of the states with a high suicide rate, and low access to mental health care. 

A pair of World War II veterans from the Pacific Northwest and their escorts will return 70 inscribed Japanese flags Tuesday directly to the prime minister of Japan.

HUD Secretary Announces New Round Of Funding For Housing For Homeless Vets

Apr 21, 2015
AP Images

  A new initiative from the U.S. Housing and Urban Development department will help homeless veterans with mental health issues find housing. HUD Secretary Julián Castro made the announcement in Seattle today.

HUD is partnering with the department of Veterans Affairs to help get veterans connected to housing and to VA services.

This new round of money will help about 9-thousand veterans across the country. That's about a fifth of the overall population of homeless veterans in the U.S.


The suicide rate among recent veterans is about 50 percent higher than non veterans with similar demographics. But a study published Wednesday found that deploying to a war zone didn't necessarily increase a service members' suicide risk.

The U.S. Department of Defense study examined data from nearly 4 million service members who served between 2001 and 2007. It found that of the 5,041 suicides by 2009, the service members who deployed were no more likely to kill themselves than those who had not deployed.

Rex Ziak

Some aging veterans of World War Two are embarking on one more mission related to that long ago war. In some cases, wives or children are taking on the mission if the vet has passed away. The object is to return Japanese flags taken as war souvenirs from Pacific battlefields.

On D-Day, Oregon Dedicates World War II Memorial

Jun 6, 2014
Chris Lehman

In Oregon, D-Day meant the dedication of a long-awaited memorial honoring World War II vets. Hundreds turned out for a ceremony Friday on the 70th anniversary of the Allied invasion of western Europe.

Chris Lehman / Northwest News Network

June 6 is the 70th anniversary of the Allied invasion of western Europe. And this year’s D-Day will be especially meaningful for World War II veterans in Oregon. The state's long-awaited World War II Memorial will open on that day. Salem Correspondent Chris Lehman spoke with one veteran of the conflict who plans to attend the dedication ceremony.

In five wars over 10 years, Ron Capps shifted back and forth between being a U.S. Army officer and a State Department foreign service officer in some of the world's deadliest places.

In Afghanistan, Iraq and elsewhere, he served as a senior military intelligence officer. In wartime Kosovo, Darfur and Rwanda, he worked as a diplomat out in the field, documenting violence and war. As he writes in his new memoir, all the while he was almost daily "in the midst of murder, rape, the burning of villages, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ethnic cleaning or genocide."