US Supreme Court

Freedom could be just weeks away for the youngest person in the U.S. sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole.

The U.S. Supreme Court Friday agreed to take up cases challenging gay marriage bans in Michigan, Ohio, Tennessee and Kentucky.

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The U.S. Supreme Court issued a surprise decision Monday not to take up several cases on same sex marriage. That effectively makes gay marriage legal in 11 more states for a total of 30. That doesn’t count Idaho. In Idaho earlier this year a district judge ruled the state’s ban on same sex marriage unconstitutional.

Jessica Robinson / Northwest News Network

Abortion services providers say the Supreme Court’s ruling on 35-foot “buffer zones” around Massachusetts clinics won’t have much effect in the Northwest. Neither Washington, Oregon nor Idaho has the kind of law that the high court deemed unconstitutional. Clinics here rely on other measures aimed at protesters.

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A decision by the U.S. Supreme Court Thursday stemmed from a labor dispute in Yakima, Wash. The court's ruling narrowed the president's power to make recess appointments when the Senate is not in session. 

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The issue of whether gay marriage is legal in Oregon may not be settled after all. The U.S. Supreme Court is deciding whether to issue a stay on a federal judge’s recent ruling that overturned Oregon's same-sex marriage ban. Supporters of gay marriage have until Monday to submit briefs in the case.

Just a few words can hold a world of meaning. John Paul Stevens, the retired Supreme Court justice, has written a short new book in which he proposes a few words here and there that would create some sweeping changes.

The book, Six Amendments: How and Why We Should Change the Constitution, details the half-dozen ways Stevens thinks the Constitution could be improved, changes that he says are worth the trouble of the arduous amendment process.

The Seattle-area scientist who led the team that first automated the sequencing of DNA says he’s pleased with the U.S. Supreme Court decision Thursday.

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The Supreme Court today decided in favor of the timber industry in a case about the regulation of muddy waters that flow off logging roads. In a surprising move, one of the court’s conservative justices dissented, and sided with the environmentalists.

A U.S. Supreme Court ruling Monday makes it harder for miners to gain access to Northwest rivers. Environmental groups hailed the decision as a major victory.

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