Terrorism

Elaine Thompson / AP Images

FBI agents in Seattle met with reporters Friday to discuss the agency's role in fighting violent extremism.

Changes On The Way For 'No-Fly List'

Aug 20, 2014
Simone Ramella / Flickr

Changes are coming to the federal government's "No-Fly List," but it's not clear yet what those changes will be.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. On April 18th, 1983, President Ronald Reagan addressed the nation about news that had broken earlier that morning in Lebanon.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED SPEECH)

In the early years of World War I, as many as 1,000 American horses per day were shipped off to Europe to assist in the Allied war effort, even though the United States was officially neutral. Those horses became the target of germ warfare, infected with anthrax cultures on American soil; at the same time, mysterious explosions were rocking U.S. munitions factories, and fires were breaking out on ships headed to Europe.

In the years following the Sept. 11 attacks, many Americans heard the term "waterboarding" for the first time — a technique aimed to simulate the act of drowning. Waterboarding was at the center of the debate about what the CIA called "enhanced interrogation techniques" — and what critics called "torture."

John Rizzo, acting general counsel of the CIA in the years after Sept. 11, 2001, has written a memoir about his three decades at the agency. He talks with NPR's Renee Montagne about Company Man: Thirty Years of Controversy and Crisis in the CIA.

Idaho Soldier's Captor Reportedly Killed In Drone Strike

Sep 6, 2013

According to news reports out of Pakistan, a U.S. drone attack has reportedly killed the militant commander believed to be holding Idaho soldier Bowe Bergdahl captive.

CIA-Bound Ricin Letter Found In Spokane

Jun 11, 2013

The 5th letter in a ricin-poisoning investigation, addressed to the Central Intelligence Agency, has been retrieved in Spokane. Paige Browning reports.

Boise Man Arrested On Terrorism Charges

May 16, 2013

Federal agents arrested a man in Idaho Thursday suspected of conspiring to support a terrorist organization in Central Asia. Thirty-year-old Fazliddin Kurbanov is from Uzbekistan and lives in Boise.

Two federal grand juries – one in Idaho and one in Utah – handed down a total of four terrorism-related charges against Kurbanov. Federal authorities say he attempted to help the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan with money and computer software between August 2012 and May 2013. The U.S. government designates that group as a foreign terrorist organization.

U.S. Justice Department

A Seattle man received an eighteen-year prison sentence on terrorism charges on Monday. He was convicted of plotting to attack a military installation in Seattle. KUOW’s John Ryan reports from Seattle.

The Portland city employee who was charged this week with aiding terrorism has been released to await his trial.

Portland Employee Faces Terrorism Charge

Mar 6, 2013

Portland city employee Reaz Qadir Khan was arrested Tuesday on charges of conspiring to provide "material support" to terrorists.  As Kristian Foden-Vencil reports, the US Department of Justice alleges he helped a terrorist plan a deadly suicide attack in Lahore, Pakistan in 2009.

Defense Prods Operative On Sting Tactics

Jan 17, 2013

Attorneys for Mohamed Mohamud spent the morning poking holes in the government's claims that their client was dangerous. Mohamud was arrested in a sting operation. Prosecutors say he intended to kill thousands of people with a car bomb.

Anna King / Northwest News Network

President Barack Obama has been publicly warning Syria’s leaders not to use chemical weapons against their own people. The news is unexpectedly relevant in southeast Washington. Researchers at at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are developing new scientific techniques to trace chemical agents back to their sources.

U.S. Dept. of Defense

Commanders of the militant Haqqani Network say the U.S. decision to designate the group as a terrorist organization could have repercussions for a captive Idaho soldier. That’s according to reports out Friday from Reuters and NBC.

U.S. Army

Negotiations to release an Idaho soldier in Taliban captivity will be a long and slow process. That’s according to Middle East experts following peace talks about Afghanistan. News reports over the weekend suggested negotiations over a ceasefire had broken down. Correspondent Jessica Robinson has more.

Bowe Bergdahl of Hailey, Idaho, has been held by the Taliban since July of 2009. Videos released by his captors show the 25-year-old Army sergeant ragged and pleading to come home. And that's a feat negotiators are reportedly trying to accomplish through a prisoner swap.