Technology

Don Ryan / / AP Images

Intel says it will lay off nearly 800 employees in Oregon as part of the company’s global restructuring.

The U.S. Department of Transportation and Paul Allen's company Vulcan Inc. are teaming up to stage a $40 million to $50 million winner-take-all competition. The prize will go to the "mid-sized" American city that comes up with the best plan to use technology of any sort to improve mobility and reduce pollution. 

Food scientists at Washington State University have an unusual new partner to help them evaluate drinks, medicines and sweeteners. It's called the "electronic tongue.”

Washington Consolidated Technology Services

The state of Washington has good cyber security standards, but state agencies don’t always adhere to those standards.

That was the finding of a performance audit released Monday.

Cyber security has emerged as a leading threat to the U.S. government and corporate America. Sony Pictures was the latest high profile victim, but state and local governments are also potential targets.

Jens Buettner / Associated Press

City of Eugene officials have ordered Uber ridesharing service to cease operating in the area or face a fine.

Uber has refused to apply for a taxi license since its drivers began operating in Eugene last summer. This rideshare service allows people to get rides from private vehicle owners through a smartphone app. 

Laura Hammond with the City of Eugene said the purpose of requiring a license is to make sure vehicles, drivers and passengers are safe.

Highways Agency / Flickr

Here's the latest get out the vote tool: A new app lets Oregonians see if their Facebook friends have voted yet. If they haven't, the app lets the user badger them until they do.

The app is called Did They Vote.

Chris Phan / Flickr

Oregon lawmakers are wading into the debate on the balance between personal privacy and public safety. Advocates on both sides weighed in on the issue before an Oregon Senate panel Thursday.

Ashley Ahearn / EarthFix

There are landslide-prone areas across the mountainous Northwest. And many people choose to live in these risky, beautiful places. The question is: How can government strike a balance between people’s property rights, and safety?

App By WSU Team Lets Cops Know When They’re Fatigued

Jan 13, 2014
Jessica Robinson

Researchers at Washington State University say the same kind of self-tracking technology that's become popular among smartphone users could also help police officers stay safer on the job. On Tuesday, a criminal justice professor will debut an app at a White House conference that monitors alertness.

Tom Banse

This week, technicians in southeast Washington continue a field test to show how carbon dioxide could be injected and trapped deep underground. It's an experiment led by the Pacific Northwest National Lab. Injection of fifty tanker truck loads of CO2 will take about four weeks. Then comes about a year and a half of monitoring to see if the global warming gas stays locked away forever beneath ancient lava flows.

Scientists are in the final weeks of preparation for the launch of the world’s largest underwater observatory.

It’s a 239 million dollar project that was funded by the National Science Foundation to better understand and monitor the depths of the Pacific Ocean – from volcanic eruptions to deep-sea earthquakes that could lead to tsunamis.

EarthFix’s Ashley Ahearn visited with the team and has this update.

Photo by Aaron Kunz / EarthFix

An alliance of Northwest power utilities kicked off a campaign this month to curb energy use by college football fans. EarthFix Reporter Aaron Kunz has more.

Photo courtesy Seattle Museum of Communications.

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the 1962 Seattle World’s Fair. The event gave visitors a peek at how they might communicate and use something called a computer in the 21st Century. Ahead a look at some of the technological innovations unveiled at Seattle's Space Age Worl'ds Fair. KUOW's Harriet Baskas and Jack Straw Productions reports.

Oregon will soon be home to the first large-scale wave research site in the United States. A $4 million grant from the Department of Energy is helping fund the facility.

The project will be connected to the electrical grid on-shore so that researchers can test how much power the buoys convert into electricity. Belinda Batten is with Oregon State University and will direct the facility. She says the project will help developers make wave energy more commercially available with large-scale technology.

Photo courtesy Northwest News Network

A wi-fi connection and smart phone bar codes could be coming to a state park near you. Those are just two of the ideas under consideration as Washington State Parks tries to recruit a new generation of visitors. Olympia Correspondent Austin Jenkins explains.

University of Idaho and City of Moscow officials held a groundbreaking ceremony Wednesday for a new $2 million Intermodal Transit Center on the Palouse. The facility will be located on the east end of the university campus and serve as a hub for regional buses, taxis, and other transportation services. This is UI President Duane Nellis.

Nellis: “This type of facility is something that I think is important for our community, that is a community that we are looking to grow in a quality way, toward sustainable development.”

Facebook is about to write a very big check to Microsoft. Microsoft announced yesterday it is selling hundreds of patents to Facebook for more than a half a billion dollars.

Photo by Anna King / Northwest News Network

RICHLAND, Wash. – At the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in southeast Washington, the race is on to clean up radioactive sludge buried in aging underground tanks. Some of that waste has already leaked into the soil not far from the Columbia River. But attempts to use high-tech robotics to hose out waste tanks haven't gone as planned. And an important federal cleanup deadline is fast approaching. Correspondent Anna King visited one Hanford tank farm to see what’s causing the delays.

Photo courtesy Nereus Program.

VANCOUVER, B.C. – In Greek mythology, the original god of the sea was named Nereus. Among other powers, he could prophesy the future. That’s why researchers at the University of British Columbia thought to name a project to predict future ocean conditions after Nereus. Now, the initial computer simulations are out. Correspondent Tom Banse reports.