supreme court

Greg Rizzo /

Imagine a piece of music feels so important to you that you just have to share it. And you’re in a position not only to share it with your fellow musicians, but also to perform it for the audiences who look to you for just this sort of inspiration. Now imagine that you can't share it after all. Why? Because it would cost you more to program that music than your small regional or university orchestra could possibly afford.

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Like most sitting Supreme Court justices, Sonia Sotomayor is circumspect when talking about the court; but she has written intimately about her personal life — more so than is customary for a Supreme Court justice.

"When I was nominated by the president for this position, it became very clear to me that many people in the public were interested in my life and the challenges I had faced," she tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "... And I also realized that much of the public perception of who I was and what had happened to me was not quite complete."

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Federal authorities say they’re working on the release of Kenneth Bae – the University of Oregon graduate believed to be in a North Korean prison. Government-run news outlets in North Korea say Bae has received as much as a 15-year sentence from the country’s Supreme Court for allegedly undermining the government.

Washington’s State Supreme Court Makes History

Jan 14, 2013

The Washington State Supreme Court will make history Monday when newly elected Justice Sheryl Gordon McCloud is sworn in. KUOW’s Patricia Murphy reports.

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments Monday in a case from Oregon over water pollution from logging roads. Amelia Templeton of EarthFix reports a last minute rule change may have made the case moot.

Schools Chief Asks For 39% Budget Increase

Oct 5, 2012

Washington Superintendent of Public Instruction Randy Dorn has asked for an additional four-point-one-billion dollars for basic education in his biennial budget proposal. Ann Dornfeld reports.

It took seven years and hundreds of court filings. Now the legal fight over Washington’s top-two primary is over. The U.S. Supreme Court Monday declined to hear an appeal brought by the state’s Democratic and Libertarian parties. Olympia Correspondent Austin Jenkins reports.

Photo by Austin Jenkins / Northwest News Network

The Washington Supreme Court could decide by the end of this year whether a voter-approved two-thirds requirement for tax hikes is constitutional. But first, the justices must determine who has the right to challenge the law. That technical question was the focus of oral arguments Tuesday. Olympia Correspondent Austin Jenkins has details.

Gas station owners in Washington have won the right to proceed with a lawsuit against the state. They’re challenging the policy of gas tax refunds to Native American tribes who operate their own gas stations. Olympia Correspondent Austin Jenkins has more on the implications.

Early primary totals indicate that two advocates for defendants’ rights could compete for the open seat on the Washington supreme court: Sheryl Gordon McCloud and Richard Sanders. KUOW’s Amy Radil reports.

Four candidates had sought to replace retiring supreme court justice Tom Chambers. They included longtime King County Superior Court judge Bruce Hilyer, and former Pierce county executive John Ladenburg. But primary night totals showed appellate defense lawyer Sheryl Gordon McCloud and former state supreme court justice Richard Sanders in the lead.

Washington Supreme Court Justice Steve Gonzalez was appointed to the state’s high court six months ago. Now he’s up for reelection.

His opponent is Bruce Danielson, a Kitsap county attorney who has declined to campaign. The race will be decided in the August 7th primary, and Gonzalez says he’s rushing to build name recognition. KUOW’s Amy Radil reports.

The Supreme Court’s decision on the health care law threw many members of Congress for a loop. Many northwest lawmakers were surprised that the Supreme Court upheld the law’s individual mandate and put limits on the government’s attempt to expand Medicaid. Matt Laslo reports from the nation’s capital.

Small business owners are also trying to gauge what the health care ruling means for them. Their views are sharply divided.

Photo by Amelia Templeton / Northwest News Network

The Supreme Court is being advised not to take on a controversial logging pollution lawsuit that began in Oregon. Amelia Templeton explains.

Wash. Supreme Court Orders New Trial For Darold Stenson

May 10, 2012
Washington Department of Corrections

The high court says that Darold Stenson’s rights were violated. In their ruling the justices say the state wrongfully suppressed photographs that raised questions about mishandling of evidence as well as an FBI file.

Sheryl Gordon McCloud is Stenson’s attorney.
“The photograph, which we didn’t discover until a few years ago shows the lead detective on the case with his bare ungloved hands holding those pants with those pockets turned out shortly before the gunshot residue test was taken. A picture is worth a thousand words cops carry gun, guns leave gunshot residue, he’s holding the pants with his ungloved hands."

The Washington Supreme Court ruled Thursday that public libraries may put Internet filters on their computers. Some librarians are cheering the ruling and say it could lead more libraries around the state to limit access to porn and other controversial material.