StoryCorps

StoryCorps Northwest

Next year, the Pierce County AIDS Foundation celebrates its 25th anniversary. They’d hoped they’d never have to. But the AIDS epidemic has not ended. Pierce County has more than 1,000 residents living with HIV. Hilary Klein is the lead medical case manager for the PCAF. She spoke to her co-worker, Jill Frey, about her brother and how he inspired her to become an AIDS activist.

StoryCorps Northwest

In the mid-1950s and 60s, eight to nine nuclear reactors were in operation in Hanford, Washington. Water used to cool the reactors went into the Columbia River, and carried with it radioactive elements downstream. Scientists monitored radiation levels in school children around the Tri Cities using radiation monitoring counters. Roy Gephart is the author of Hanford: A Conversation about Nuclear Waste and Cleanup. One day while he was researching radiation monitoring counters, his then girlfriend, Sheila Zilar, came to him with valuable information. 

StoryCorps Northwest

After his father's sudden death in 1943, Art Oberto, with the help of his mother, took over snack company O Boy! Oberto. He was just 16. In 1954 he married Dorothy and they started to run the company together, Dorothy minding the books. The couple had four children, and as their family expanded, so did the the company, with many ups and downs. Their marriage had its ups and downs too, as many relationships do, but to their granddaughter, Cindy, they are rock solid. Married for 57 years, they share their relationship advice with Cindy on StoryCorps Northwest.

StoryCorps Northwest

For 11 year old Anand Hernandez there's a lot of things to worry about; gym class, scary 8th graders and making your family happy. In today's StoryCorps we listen in on a conversation between Anand and his mother, Sarah Avant, about potentially expanding the family.

StoryCorps Northwest

It's 1900 a German immigrant, along with 15 partners bought 900,000 acres of timberland in Washington state. The company was Weyerhaeuser. Decades later, under president and CEO Jack Creighton, Weyerhaeuser found itself facing environmentalists, who wanted logging to stop, in order to protect the spotted owl. For StoryCorps Northwest, Jack Creighton shares a lesson learned from that experience with Jimmy Collins.

StoryCorps Northwest

Imagine never knowing your mother, but having a sense that your birth caused her death. Your father holds you responsible, and he himself, overwhelmed with grief, attempts to end his own life. In the midst of this despair, a stranger is awoken by God and gets in his car to save your father. That's Pat Cabbage's story. Here he shares the story of his birth, with his wife Beverly, and their daughter Katie, for StoryCorps Tri Cities.

StoryCorps Northwest

The city of Richland was once a very small agricultural community. Then during the Second World War, the US army turned it into a bedroom community for workers on the Manhattan Project in neighboring Hanford. Richland became a closed city. Only residents had access, along with those who got Army clearance. Retired chemist Steve Buckingham, telling his daughter Theresa Bergsman about life in Richland in 1947.

StoryCorps Northwest

Imagine meeting the love of your life and spending a whole blissful summer together traveling the east coast. Then, you're off to different colleges and one day, you get news that the love of your life has died. That's what happened to Celeste Allen, but as it turns out, Ed Allen wasn't dead. He was very much alive. From StoryCorps Tri Cities, a love story with a happy ending.

In the 1950s Pasco, Kennewick and Richland were rival towns. It would take a couple of decades before the residence would accept a common moniker, the Tri Cities. The mayor of Pasco, Matt Watkins brought his mother, Sue Frost, to the mobile recording booth in the Tri Cities to share how their family's laundry business and hydroplane races brought the towns closer together.

StoryCorps Northwest

Jack Briggs and Ken Robertson share the story of how the Tri Cities got its name. They were the first inteview in the Tri Cities at the StoryCorps mobile recording booth.

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