Social Media

Rowan Moore Gerety / Northwest Public Radio

“There will always be a part of you that simply doesn’t translate.”

That’s the slogan Target used in a new social media campaign with the hashtag #SinTraduccion, or “untranslatable.” The campaign is aimed at Hispanic millennials, a demographic Target—the nation’s fourth largest retailer—now counts as its core customer group.

By one estimate, the buying power of U.S. Latinos overall is three times what it was in the year 2000: $1.5 trillion and counting.

The 38-year-old man accused of sending ricin-laced letters to a federal judge and the Spokane post office had an active social media presence. But his online profiles contain no hints at a grudge toward the federal government. This was also not his first run-in with the law. Jessica Robinson reports.

SALEM, Ore. – Oregon lawmakers think employers should just log off when it comes to asking workers for their Facebook passwords. A House panel debated a measure Friday that would prohibit companies from demanding access to their employees' social media accounts.

The idea surfaced after national news reports of people being forced to turn over their Facebook passwords as a condition of getting or keeping a job. It’s not clear whether that’s been happening in the Northwest.

WSU Athletics

By Joe Utter and Adam Lewis

Washington State University Coach Mike Leach banned players from using Twitter on Tuesday evening after a series of messages on the social media website was brought to his attention.

“Twitter is now banned around here so don’t expect anything on Twitter,” Leach said after Tuesday’s practice. “Twitter’s banned and quite frankly if after today you see anything on Twitter from our team-- and I don’t care if it says ‘I love life’-- I would like to see it because I will suspend them.”

Facebook

It’s election time again: the Washington state primary is Tuesday. And the election process is changing. Every county in the state uses mail-in ballots now. And social media is gaining a bigger role in the election process.

The next time a big wildfire erupts or an earthquake unleashes near you, Twitter, Google and Facebook might be useful places to turn. And not just you. Disaster response agencies are plunging into social media. They can develop better situational awareness by seeking out your online gripes and observations. Digital platforms also provide an avenue to give more frequent official updates and correct misinformation during a catastrophe. Correspondent Tom Banse reports.