Science

Musical Language
7:49 am
Wed June 18, 2014

Radiolab: The Language Of Music And The Music Of Language

Composer Igor Fyodorovich Stravinsky, whose composition Rite of Spring was controversial at its debut in 1913.
Credit Wikki Commons

What is music? Why does it move us? How does the brain process sound, and why are some people better at it than others?

Radiolab posed this question, and seeks to understand the DNA of music - and the connection between music and language.

In a recent episode, Radiolab looked at the disastrous debut of Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring in 1913, examined music through modern neurology, and met a composer using computers to decode music and find its essential pieces.

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Gene Patents
8:40 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Seattle Scientist Says Patenting DNA Was Becoming Obsolete

The Seattle-area scientist who led the team that first automated the sequencing of DNA says he’s pleased with the U.S. Supreme Court decision Thursday.

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Science Crowdfunding
6:40 am
Tue May 21, 2013

Crowdfunding Coal Science

Scientists hope to use crowdfunding to study the impact coal trains like this one could have on the Northwest.
Credit Katie Campbell

Crowdfunding and kickstarter campaigns have become popular online tools to raise money for fledgling businesses and independent projects. Scientists are starting to use these sites to fund research as well.

State and federal agencies have begun the environmental review process for the two largest coal export terminals on the West coast. Now there are some scientists who are asking the public to chip in for studies about the impacts of exporting coal. Ashley Ahearn reports for EarthFix.

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Dogs and Humans
11:05 am
Thu April 18, 2013

Bacteria On Dog Lovers' Skin Reveal Their Affection

Should we say Germ-an shepherd? Mango Doucleff, of Washington, shows off the bacteria living on her tongue, which also flourish on her owner's skin.
Michaeleen Doucleff NPR

Originally published on Fri April 19, 2013 10:43 am

Well, it looks like there really is such as thing as a dog person.

Humans who share their homes with canines also share the similar bacterial houseguests on their skin, ecologists reported Tuesday in the journal eLIFE.

In fact, two dog owners who don't even know each other have about as many of the skin bacteria in common as a married couple living together.

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Underwater Observatory
7:19 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Largest Underwater Observatory Preparing For Launch Off Northwest Coast

Scientists are in the final weeks of preparation for the launch of the world’s largest underwater observatory.

It’s a 239 million dollar project that was funded by the National Science Foundation to better understand and monitor the depths of the Pacific Ocean – from volcanic eruptions to deep-sea earthquakes that could lead to tsunamis.

EarthFix’s Ashley Ahearn visited with the team and has this update.

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Narwhal Research
6:21 am
Tue April 9, 2013

Bringing Art To Narwhal Research In The Arctic

An artist's sketchbook used in studying the landscape and nature in Greenland.
Credit Ashley Ahearn / EarthFix

Artists have accompanied scientists and explorers for hundreds of years - documenting discoveries of new species and uncharted territory.

Well, that tradition is still alive and well.

Ashley Ahearn interviewed two Seattleites on a scientific and artistic expedition to study Narwhals in Greenland, and produced this audio postcard.

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Citizen Science
6:36 am
Wed August 8, 2012

"Citizen Science" Gains Momentum In Northwest And Nationally

Joan Rupp of Tacoma counts and records bird sightings outside her living room window as part of Project FeederWatch.
Photo by Tom Banse Northwest News Network

Public participation in scientific research is mushrooming in the Northwest and across the country. The trend is called "citizen science." It can take the form of volunteer monitoring and data collection, or crowd-sourced science, or science education with a research component. One sign the movement is gaining acceptance and credibility: It's a big topic of discussion at a science conference in Portland this week. Correspondent Tom Banse reports.

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Rock Doc
8:40 am
Wed July 18, 2012

Swimming In The Olympics: What A Drag

Dr. E. Kirsten Peters
Photo courtesy Washington State University

Republished from WSUNews

 

PULLMAN, Wash. - I swim laps at noon several times a week. I enjoy the water, and the gentle exercise is good for my aging joints.

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Fuel Cells
6:26 am
Tue June 12, 2012

Fuel Cells Could Power Your Neighborhood

Researchers have developed a fuel cell that could one day power your neighborhood. From EarthFix, Courtney Flatt explains, this new system is much more efficient than power plants.

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