Rock Doc

Washington State University

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Washington State University

    What if there were a two-for-one sale on kilowatts? Your power bill would be cut in half -- not a bad result for your monthly budget.   

Washington State University

    

Here's the golden tale of, well... gold. WSU’s Rock Doc, Dr. E. Kirsten Peters, brings us up to date on a glittering rock discovered in California.

Washington State University

How do you catch and prosecute someone illegally trafficking nuclear materials? You could catch them uranium-handed… except that granite also contains traces of uranium. That’s the challenge of nuclear forensics: telling what’s evidence of nuclear material, and what’s just background noise. WSU’s Nathalie Wall is a chemist who handles nuclear forensics. The Rock Doc, Kirsten Peters, brings us her story.  

Smarter Than Your Average Bear

Oct 4, 2014
Washington State University

WSU is known for its smart Cougars. But soon it could have a reputation for something else – intelligent bears. Bears that use tools, like some primates and birds. Veterinary student Alex Waroff tested the bears’ intelligence, and found some surprising results. WSU’s Rock Doc, Kirsten Peters, has the story of WSU’s bright bears.

Alex Waroff had a fantastic summer job this year. The veterinary student at Washington State University worked with faculty members as they tested just how clever grizzly bears are. What’s at issue is the use of tools.

Washington State University

While I have been dinking around for months, trying to lose five pounds, two of my friends have gotten serious about weight loss. Each of them is down 50 pounds.

I’m pleased for them, of course, and truly impressed by their accomplishments. Successfully combating overweight and obesity is one of the best things people can do for their health. It can help everything from joint pain to heart function, from Type 2 diabetes to certain aspects of mental health.

Northwest Public Radio

Nothing could be better—or healthier—than a walk through the countryside, right?  Wrong.  New research reveals that walking briskly could be better.  "Rock Doc"  Kirsten Peters explains.

My Labrador-mix from the pound, Buster Brown by name, loves to walk with me. On the weekends we often do a six-mile walk around town or along the Snake River where Buster can be off leash (as Mother Nature intends).

Hitchster / flickr.com

Asphalt: It’s everywhere and it’s expensive.  And its production is tough on air quality.  But a researcher at Washington State University may have a better way: asphalt made from waste cooking oil. "Rock Doc"  Kirsten Peters explains.

Dr. Haifang Wen grew up in a rural area of Shandong province, in eastern China. In his youth there were not many paved highways in the Chinese countryside.

“Lots of the roads were gravel,” he told me recently. “They were muddy when it rained. I remember riding a cow on them, or going along in a wagon pulled by a donkey.”

nwpr.org

If you live in the U.S. there’s a 47% chance that you have a dog.  That number goes up to 56% if you live in Canada. When your dog goes on a walk with you, snuggles up next to you on the couch or tilts her head at something you say the bond between you deepens.  Here comes the heartbreaking aspect of having a dog.  They just don’t live long enough.  Dr. Kirsten  Peters, the “Rock Doc” offers some insight into why.

Washington State University

The “fiscal cliff” and sequestration are words you’ve heard a lot in recent months.  In light of the United States’ growing deficit and budget crisis, Dr. Kirsten Peters looks at how a purposeful national energy plan could save the US a lot of money.

To a geologist like me, it was most notable by its absence in the political campaigns that lurched to their conclusions in November. I’m talking about an energy plan with real teeth, one that addresses everything from national security to the cost of energy to greenhouse warming of the planet.

What A Drag

Jul 27, 2012
Photo courtesy Washington State University

I swim laps at noon several times a week. I enjoy the water, and the gentle exercise is good for my aging joints.

Like other old ladies in the pool, I’m no speed demon. Even a bucketful of performance enhancing drugs would not make me slice through the water quickly. But like all the lap swimmers I know, slow or fast, I take an interest in Michael Phelps and the other American swimmers soon to compete in London in the 2012 Summer Olympics.

Photo courtesy Washington State University

Republished from WSUNews

 

PULLMAN, Wash. - I swim laps at noon several times a week. I enjoy the water, and the gentle exercise is good for my aging joints.

Victory Over The Angel Of Death

Jun 15, 2012
Photo courtesy Washington State University

In a 1789 letter, Benjamin Franklin wrote: "In this world, nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes." Well, it should interest you to know that death is no longer a certainty, at least for one species. The Rock Doc, Dr. Kirsten Peters, has the details.

"The gene for death has been isolated –and reversed- by scientists. Not a bad day’s work, you might say.

Sorry, it’s not the death of human beings that’s at issue. But it is a gene for death that’s embedded in a plant on which we all directly depend each day. And that’s good enough to be plenty encouraging.

Rock Doc: Our Daily Bread In 2050

Apr 26, 2012
Washington State University

One of my habits in recent years has been studying climate history in my free time. What can I say; it keeps me out of bars.

Recently, I was startled to learn that the temperatures experienced by American wheat farms back in the 1830s were almost 7 degrees warmer than they now are.