police

The police force in Washington’s state capital is changing. Fourteen months ago a white police officer in Olympia shot two African-American brothers. The shooting triggered local protests, but not a national outcry -- the brothers survived, although one was paralyzed.

If an Idaho state trooper stops an Idaho driver just across the Washington state line and a lawsuit ensues—whose case is it? The Washington Supreme Court Thursday said it’s basically a legal coin toss. 

Unpacking Videos of Police Shootings—At The Police Academy

Apr 30, 2015
Rowan Moore Gerety / Northwest Public Radio

  

At the Criminal Justice Training Center in Burien, instructor Russ Hicks spends part of every day scanning the internet for commentary and videos on officer-involved violence around the country. As a string of police killings of unarmed black men has focused the attention of the country on use of force and racial bias in policing, Hicks says many of the clips he sees are brought forward by his students, often within hours of their release.

A group of Tri-Cities, Washington, residents hiked 14 miles across Richland, Kennewick and Pasco Tuesday to protest the shooting of Antonio Zambrano-Montes by police officers.

Salem Considers Profiling Complaint System

Mar 31, 2015
jimmywayne / Flickr

Lawmakers in Salem took up a bill yesterday that would require the state to set up a method for recording profiling complaints against law enforcement agencies.

According to the Center for Intercultural Organizing, Oregon is among just eight states that don't ban profiling.

According to the nonprofit, Oregon also has no way for people to document or report cases. Rather, the state leaves issues of profiling up to individual law enforcement agencies.

The family of a man shot by police in Pasco, Washington, this month is challenging police investigators’ autopsy findings.

Kennewick police investigating the police shooting this month of Antonio Zambrano-Montes told reporters Wednesday bullets entered him from the front, and a rock was found near his body.

Anna King / Northwest News Network

Kennewick police investigating the police shooting this month of Antonio Zambrano-Montes say so far they know bullets entered him from the front, and a rock was found near his body.

People have demonstrated against Pasco police and questioned whether officers used excessive force to stop him when, witnesses say, he was throwing rocks in traffic.

People from the Tri-Cities’ large Latino population gathered outside Wednesday’s Kennewick police media briefing to give reporters their opinions.

The congressional wrangling over immigration policy -- which threatens to cut off Homeland Security money later this week -- is spilling over to the Washington State Capitol in a fashion.

Anna King / Northwest News Network

In the Tri-Cities new facts emerged in the police shooting of Antonio Zambrano-Montes . Investigators said none of the three Pasco officers involved in the shooting were certified Spanish speakers. Latinos in Pasco have been protesting and calling for a federal investigation. 

Pasco is a farming town nestled snug into the confluence of the Columbia, Snake and Yakima rivers in southeast Washington. Onion peels flit like butterflies along the highways. But the shooting of a Latino man by Pasco police last week has thrust this fast-growing town into the national spotlight.

When he was shot dead by police officers in Pasco, Washington, Antonio Zambrano-Montes did not have a gun or knife, investigators said at a press conference on Friday.

Anna King / Northwest News Network

Tuesday night’s shooting of a man near a popular grocery store by three Pasco police officers has angered many residents there. The shooting was captured in several phone videos now on YouTube. A protest was held outside of Pasco City Hall Wednesday night.

Demonstrators gathered in Pasco, Washington, Wednesday afternoon, to protest the fatal police shooting of a man killed after allegedly throwing rocks on Tuesday night.

Associated Press

The rollout of police body cameras in Washington has been slow, even for Spokane which purchased more than 200 of the devices. Before full implementation, police leaders will ask the legislature for changes.

The US Department of Justice has found leadership was lacking amongst Spokane police for more than eight years. This came in a list of 42 recommendations handed down by the federal COPS program to the Spokane Police Department Friday.

The recommendations came after the police department requested a federal review of its use of force practices. It stems from a 2006 case, in which Spokane man Otto Zehm was beaten by police and died.

COPS Director Ron Davis says they reviewed more than 200 use-of-force cases from the past five years.

Chris Lehman / Northwest News Network

Law enforcement groups in Washington state are pushing back against possible limits on police use of drones. That happened as a task force convened by the governor wrestled some more Monday about how to regulate small unmanned aircraft.

In April, Democratic Governor Jay Inslee vetoed the Washington Legislature's first attempt to regulate government use of drones. Now police groups are worried the planned second try will handcuff their ability to take advantage of the new technology. Mitch Barker directs the Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs.

Filer Police Department

A handful of recent incidents where police have shot pet dogs in Idaho have angered animal rights advocates. One dog owner in the small town of Filer has issued notice that he intends to sue the city over the death of his dog, Hooch. As Jessica Robinson reports, pet owners do have legal recourse in these situations, and, in fact, a body of federal court rulings to back them up.

One basis for lawsuits like the one in Filer is the Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. Federal courts have determined dogs are property and killing them may count as unreasonable seizure.

Idaho State Police

Recreational marijuana goes on sale Tuesday in Washington state. But police across the border in Idaho and Oregon say that doesn't mean the pot will stay there. Law enforcement worry people will try to sneak pot products across the border – or worse, the legal market in Washington will seep into the black-market. Correspondent Jessica Robinson reports from Idaho, where the contrast in pot laws is especially stark.

Seattle Police say it was a Seattle Pacific University Student who disarmed a gunman on campus Thursday.

Police have arrested the man they believe killed one person and wounded three others. At this point police believe the gunman acted alone and was not a student at the university. KUOW's Patricia Murphy reports.

Washington State Patrol

The summer driving season is approaching. That means road trips and family adventures. But also the chance of getting pulled over by the police for speeding or some other moving violation. The Washington State Patrol is reminding drivers what to do and not do if you’re stopped.

Washington Department of Licensing

A new report reveals the state of Washington issued nearly 3,000 fictitious driver’s licenses to police agencies over the last 25 years. That’s nearly twice as many as originally reported by the Washington Department of Licensing.

App By WSU Team Lets Cops Know When They’re Fatigued

Jan 13, 2014
Jessica Robinson

Researchers at Washington State University say the same kind of self-tracking technology that's become popular among smartphone users could also help police officers stay safer on the job. On Tuesday, a criminal justice professor will debut an app at a White House conference that monitors alertness.

The death of an Oregon police officer this week spotlights a little known element of Northwest law enforcement: volunteer reserve officers who put their lives on the line for little or no pay.

Paige Browning

Regulating government surveillance in Spokane took the spotlight in Monday’s city council meeting. But the newest, flashiest police equipment is being ignored under city regulations.

An Oregon man convicted of killing a police officer more than 20 years ago will stay behind bars for at least a few more months. The Oregon Board of Parole said Tuesday that it will re-examine its decision to release Sidney Dean Porter. Salem Correspondent Chris Lehman has details on the case.

In Olympia, May Day protesters faced-off with police in riot gear Wednesday night. But the two sides did not clash. A group of about 50 mostly young people – some of them wearing face masks - marched for more than an hour through the streets of downtown Olympia, disrupting traffic.

May Day Protests In Seattle Turn Ugly Again

May 2, 2013
Deborah Wang / Northwest News Network

May Day began peacefully in Seattle with a march for immigration reform. But in the evening, hundreds of protesters clashed with police.

OLYMPIA, Wash. – For decades, police officers in Washington have been able to obtain false driver licenses for undercover work. But this quasi-secret program inside the Department of Licensing only recently came to light. It turns out the confidential ID program was never approved by the legislature. Now two state lawmakers are calling for more oversight to prevent possible abuses.

As a street cop in the early 1980s, Mitch Barker went undercover to work drugs and vice. The Washington Department of Licensing helped him assume a fake identity.

Two Washington state lawmakers are raising questions about a quasi-secret program inside the state’s Department of Licensing. For decades, the agency has issued false IDs to undercover police officers. But the legislature never approved the program.

U.S. Justice Department

A Seattle man received an eighteen-year prison sentence on terrorism charges on Monday. He was convicted of plotting to attack a military installation in Seattle. KUOW’s John Ryan reports from Seattle.

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