oil transport

Sam Beebe / Flickr

Oregon Senators Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkely are asking federal railroad officials to use their authority and place a moratorium on crude oil moving through the Columbia River Gorge. The railroad involved with this month’s oil train derailment has said those trains will resume this week.

21 Arrested In Vancouver Oil Train Protest

Jun 20, 2016
Coast Guard PFC Levi Read / Wikimedia Commons

Police arrested 19 people who refused to leave the BNSF railroad tracks in Vancouver on Saturday. They were protesting oil train service in the Northwest after a train carrying Bakken crude oil derailed in the Columbia River Gorge derailed two weeks ago.

Emily Schwing / Northwest News Network

Residents of Mosier, Oregon were told Sunday night they can return to their homes.

An oil train that derailed and caught fire forced more than 100 to evacuate last week. Just over 400 people live in the sleepy town surrounded by cherry orchards and basalt cliffs.

Paige Browning / Spokane Public Radio

The Washington department of Ecology has completed a draft report to the legislature outlining safety recommendations to deal with increased oil train traffic in the state.

The Ecology department worked with the Utilities and Transportation Commission and the state’s Emergency Management Division to prepare the draft report on improving public safety. Lisa Copeland is a spokeswoman for Ecology.

Raymond D. Woods Jr. / Flickr

BNSF Railway said it will comply with a Saturday federal deadline to provide states with information about the frequency and routes of oil trains from North Dakota and Montana.

The railroad made that announcement Friday even though Washington, Oregon and Idaho have balked at signing confidentiality agreements about the crude oil shipments.

Central Oregon Grapples With Rising Oil Train Safety Risks

May 20, 2014
Friends of the Gorge

U.S. Senator Ron Wyden will meet with emergency officials in Central Oregon this week to talk about oil train safety. For EarthFix, Cassandra Profita reports.

Environmental regulators in Washington state are expecting a lively crowd Thursday in the coastal city of Hoquiam. The public gets a chance there to weigh in about increased crude oil train traffic.

More oil is moving through Washington state from the Bakken oil fields of North Dakota. That has many concerned about oil train safety. The oil has proven extremely flammable, causing several explosions in North America.

State legislators on both sides of the aisle introduced bills to address the concerns.

But the session ended last week without a compromise.

The U.S. Department of Transportation issued an emergency order Tuesday requiring crude oil from North Dakota and Montana to be tested before being transported by railroads.

Powerful members of the Washington state Senate are on board with a plan to tax crude oil shipped into the state by rail.

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