Tiadl Energy
6:08 am
Tue August 14, 2012

Puget Sound Tidal Energy Project Challenged

The Washington coast is home to some of the strongest tidal currents in the country. Some want to harness those tides for power. Ashley Ahearn reports a proposed tidal power facility in Puget Sound is running into some trouble.

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Arctic Oil Drilling
5:52 am
Mon July 30, 2012

Delays In Bellingham Curtail Arctic Oil Drilling

Shell's Arctic Challenger, under construction on the Bellingham waterfront.
Photo by John Ryan KUOW

Shell Oil is scaling back its plans for drilling in the Arctic Ocean this year. Icy conditions in the far North and construction problems in Bellingham have delayed the company's efforts. KUOW's John Ryan reports from Seattle.

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Tsunami Dock
6:15 pm
Wed June 27, 2012

Tsunami Dock Species Under The Microscope

The Japanese dock washed up on an Oregon beach earlier this month.
Oregon State Parks

The Japanese dock that washed ashore in Oregon carried more than a few invasive species. Scientists have found enough living cargo to keep them busy for decades.

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Tsunami Dock
7:04 am
Mon June 11, 2012

No Decision Yet On The Fate of Tsunami Debris

Oregon Parks officials are still weighing their options for the giant piece of tsunami debris that washed up on the Oregon coast this week. The Japanese dock continues to draw onlookers to the beach near Newport.

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Undersea Volcano
6:45 am
Mon June 11, 2012

Caught On Tape! Undersea Volcano Erupts Off Northwest Coast

Hydrophone deployed at Axial Seamount.
Photo by Bill Chadwick OSU

For the first time, we're getting to listen to the eruption of an undersea volcano off the Northwest coast. Correspondent Tom Banse got a hold of unusual recordings made at a place called Axial Seamount. It's about 300 miles out to sea from Cannon Beach, Oregon.

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Ocean Floor Ecology
6:28 am
Fri June 8, 2012

Deep-Sea Stowaways Get A Leg Up From Scientists

Scientists working more than a mile underwater off the Washington coast have learned that the bottom of the ocean is surprisingly vulnerable to human disturbance. Even from scientists. KUOW's John Ryan reports from Seattle.

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Puget Sound Acidification
7:28 am
Fri May 25, 2012

Algae and Puget Sound Acidification Linked

Christopher Krembs, an oceanographer with the Washington Department of Ecology, photographs algae in Puget Sound.
Photo by Ashley Ahearn Northwest News Network

The ocean absorbs a large portion of the CO2 that we release into the atmosphere from our power plants and tail pipes. But when it gets there that CO2 makes the water more acidic and less hospitable for some creatures, like shellfish. In Puget Sound some shellfish hatcheries have already lost millions of oyster larvae because of exposure to acidic water.

Ocean acidification has scientists and policymakers in the Northwest concerned. Washington Governor Chris Gregoire has convened a panel on Ocean Acidification, which met this week. Ashley Ahearn reports.

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Algae Bloom
6:02 am
Tue May 15, 2012

Algae Booming in Puget Sound

The white foamy line marks a bloom of algae in South Puget Sound.
Photo by Ashley Ahearn Northwest News Network

All this warm weather is making for a lot of shiny happy people in Western Washington. Turns out the algae in the waters of Puget Sound are feeling the same way. Ashley Ahearn reports that algal blooms are making one scientist take note.

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Puget Sound Waste Regulations
5:48 am
Wed April 25, 2012

New Restrictions On Cruise Ship Waste Discharge For The Port Of Seattle

As the weather warms up, cruise ships will begin arriving at the Port of Seattle. More than 200 ships are scheduled to visit the port this year, bringing millions of dollars in tourist revenue. In the past those ships have also brought wastewater into Puget Sound. But this year, the regulations are a little bit stricter. Ashley Ahearn reports.

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Jellyfish Populations
5:53 am
Mon April 23, 2012

New Report: Jellyfish Populations Increasing Globally

Jellyfish populations are on the rise, globally. That’s according to a new study from the University of British Columbia. But, as Ashley Ahearn reports, it’s too soon to say if that’s the case in the Northwest.

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