NWPR Books

NWPR Books
1:28 pm
Thu October 24, 2013

Questions For Oscar Martinez, Author Of 'The Beast'

Migrants ride the trains known as "la bestia," or "the beast," during their journey through Mexico to reach the U.S. border.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 24, 2013 2:42 pm

Salvadoran journalist Oscar Martinez joins this week's Alt.Latino, kicking off an occasional series of interviews about culture, society and news.

Every year, tens of thousands of Central Americans — from Honduras, Guatemala, Nicaragua and El Salvador — make a perilous overland journey to the United States. They travel north through Mexico to the U.S. border, riding on top of cargo trains known as "La Bestia" or "the Beast."

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NWPR Books
12:44 pm
Thu October 24, 2013

A Life In Science: From Housewife To Amazon Trailblazer

Aotus lemurinus, a type of owl monkey also referred to as the gray-bellied night monkey, seen here at the Santa Fe Zoo, in Medellin, Colombia.
Raul Arboleda AFP/Getty Images

It all started in 1968 at a pet shop called Fish 'N' Cheeps in New York's Greenwich Village. On the way to a Jimi Hendrix concert, Patricia Wright and her husband dashed into the shop to escape heavy rain. There, a two-pound ball of fur from the Amazon captured their attention. A few weeks and $40 later, this owl monkey became their pet; later on they acquired a female as well.

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NWPR Books
9:17 am
Thu October 24, 2013

Krauthammer's Tactical Advice For The Republican Party

Long before he was a conservative writer, Charles Krauthammer was a psychiatrist. He tells NPR's Steve Inskeep that he changed career paths because he didn't buy into popular beliefs about a psychiatrist's power: "There is a mystique about psychiatry," he says, "that people think that you have some kind of a magical lens ... Superman's X-ray vision into the soul. One of the reasons I left psychiatry is that I didn't believe that."

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NWPR Books
4:33 am
Thu October 24, 2013

Book News: Emily Dickinson Papers Go Online, Deepening Harvard-Amherst Feud

American poet Emily Dickinson, circa 1850.
Three Lions/Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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NWPR Books
12:17 am
Thu October 24, 2013

Pen Pal Of Young 'Jerry' Salinger May Have Been First To Meet Holden

J.D. Salinger wrote nine letters and postcards to aspiring Canadian writer Marjorie Sheard.
Graham Haber The Morgan Library & Museum

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 6:47 am

Fans of the reclusive J.D. Salinger are in their element these days.

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NWPR Books
12:17 am
Thu October 24, 2013

'Blockbusters': Go Big Or Go Home, Says Harvard Professor

Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 24, 2013 8:54 am

Movies like The Dark Knight or the Harry Potter series are touted as blockbusters — big-budget spectacles sure to make box office bank.

And though wannabe blockbusters can — and do — flop, like the $120 million disappointment Speed Racer, big budget is still the way to go, according to Harvard Business School professor Anita Elberse.

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NWPR Books
5:19 am
Wed October 23, 2013

Book News: Two Cleveland Kidnapping Victims Writing A Book

A poster was still on display outside the Cleveland home of Amanda Berry after she was rescued in May along with Gina DeJesus and Michelle Knight.
Tony Dejak AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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NWPR Books
4:03 am
Wed October 23, 2013

An Exhaustive Survey From Columbus To Nemesis In 'Roth Unbound'

PBS

Roth Unbound, Claudia Roth Pierpont's aptly titled study of Philip Roth's evolution as a writer, unleashes a slew of memories — including my eye-opening first encounter with Portnoy's Complaint as a naive 14-year-old. It also stokes a strong desire to re-read his books, which I suspect will be the case for many.

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NWPR Books
1:00 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

'Boxers & Saints' & Compassion: Questions For Gene Luen Yang

Gene Luen Yang broke out in 2006 with American Born Chinese, the first graphic novel nominated for a National Book Award. It weaves three stories — about a Chinese-American boy, a terrible stereotype named Chin-Kee and the mythical Monkey King — into a complex tapestry of identity and assimilation.

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NWPR Books
12:37 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

'Murdoch's World': Inside One Of The Last Old Media Empires

Media mogul Rupert Murdoch's vast empire encompasses everything from newspapers to television networks to tabloids.
Jamie McDonald AFP/Getty Images

People used to say the sun never sets on the British empire. These days, says NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik, it would be more accurate to say the sun never sets on Rupert Murdoch's empire.

In a new book, Murdoch's World, Folkenflik writes about the Australian newspaper owner whose company now stretches to India, Great Britain and the United States. He describes a powerful media insider who wants to be seen as an outsider.

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