NWPR Books

NWPR Books
7:10 am
Sun February 8, 2015

Stories That Must Be Told In 'My Documents'

To read Alejandro Zambra is to engage with someone who writes as though the burden of history were upon him and no one else — the history of his country of Chile, of literature, and of humanity's shared experience. You get it from his pages, a sense that a story must be told, intimately and without reservation.

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NWPR Books
7:03 am
Thu February 5, 2015

This 'Future Lover' Is A Library

"The more I visit libraries the more I find myself opening up to them," writes Ander Monson in his essay collection Letter to a Future Lover. It's not surprising that an author would be attracted to libraries; they are, after all, some of the last places in the world dedicated to the preservation and celebration of literature. They're also at risk of becoming endangered, casualties of budget cuts, increased Internet availability, and apathy.

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NWPR Books
9:11 am
Wed February 4, 2015

Neil Gaiman Is Back To Mess Up Your Dreams In 'Trigger Warning'

"Many of these stories end badly for at least one of the people in them. Consider yourself warned."

That's Neil Gaiman, talking directly to his readers. Talking directly to you, in the introduction to a book named for the customary warning now plastered across all potentially disturbing materials. There is stuff in here that'll mess with you, he's saying. Stuff that'll hang with you long after the bare few pages describing it have been turned, torn out, dog-eared or forgotten.

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NWPR Books
7:58 am
Wed February 4, 2015

A Few Wise Moves Lift 'Prudence' From Melodrama To Something More

Prudence, by David Treuer

Don't fuss too much about the woman left dead in the room above the village bar. Poor Prudence may lend her name to the novel's title, but, splayed alone as she is in the summer heat, the opening lines find the young woman with nothing left to say. And, when they do stumble upon her body, her neighbors and friends have little more to add to that resounding silence.

"It was, as dramatic events go, quiet," says author David Treuer, as if with one finger raised to his lips. "It was too hot, in any event, to do more than sit and shake one's head."

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NWPR Books
6:59 am
Tue February 3, 2015

'Funny Girl' Is A Book Made For Binge-Watching

Leave it to Nick Hornby to produce a smart comic novel that pits light entertainment against serious art and comes through as winning proof of the possibility of combining the two.

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NWPR Books
1:13 pm
Sun February 1, 2015

'Happy' Isn't So Happy, But It Packs A Punch

Every now and then, you find a book that's thinly plotted and has a slightly confusing, almost infuriating structure — but it's impossible to put down. The French writer Yasmina Reza has achieved exactly that with Happy are the Happy, a collection of twenty short, interconnected stories that crackle with emotion and playfulness.

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NWPR Books
11:21 am
Thu January 29, 2015

In 'Outline,' A Series Of Conversations Are Autobiographies In Miniature

The narrator of Rachel Cusk's new novel Outline is a novelist and divorced mother of two who has agreed to teach a summer course in creative writing in Athens. The novel itself is composed of some 10 conversations that she has with, among others, her seatmate on the plane flying to Greece, her students in the writing class, dinner companions and fellow teachers.

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NWPR Books
8:29 am
Thu January 29, 2015

Low-Key, Real-Life Heroism In 'March: Book Two'

Some media are custom-made for heroes. Ava DuVernay's gripping film Selma gains much of its drama from the beauty — physical and metaphysical — of David Oyelowo's portrayal of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Oyelowo's incredible voice gives practically everything King says the compelling force of a sermon, and his physical presence — strangely small and economical of motion — is as unique as it is potent.

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NWPR Books
7:39 am
Thu January 29, 2015

A Haunting, Victorian-Inflected Dystopia In 'The Mime Order'

The Bone Season, the first in Samantha Shannon's intoxicating urban-fantasy series set in 2059 in Scion (a dystopian version of England), ended with young Paige Mahoney escaping from a penal colony in the secret city of Oxford. Her Rephaim masters — immortals who feed upon the auras and blood of human clairvoyants like her — were in hot pursuit.

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NWPR Books
4:03 am
Wed January 28, 2015

'How To Grow Up' Needs To Grow Up

Michelle Tea's previous books include Rent Girl and Mermaid in Chelsea Creek.
Lydia Daniller

Originally published on Wed January 28, 2015 12:05 pm

Michelle Tea has been many things: poet, novelist, memoirist, columnist, editor, drummer, film producer and darling of the queercore scene. She captured the hearts of punk-literature fans with her 1998 debut, the novel The Passionate Mistakes and Intricate Corruption of One Girl in America, and drew praise from critics with her memoirs Rent Girl and The Chelsea Whistle.

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