NWPR Books

NWPR Books
10:37 am
Mon March 17, 2014

Author Penelope Lively Shares 'The View From Old Age'

Penelope Lively's other books include A Stitch In Time, Astercote and The Road To Lichfield.
Robbin Matthew Photography Courtesy of Viking

Originally published on Mon March 17, 2014 10:52 am

Penelope Lively describes her latest book, Dancing Fish And Ammonites, as "not quite a memoir," but rather "the view from old age," a subject she says she can report on with some authority — Monday is the British writer's 81st birthday.

Lively was born in Egypt, where her father was working at the time. She and her mother fled the country during World War II. When she was 12, in 1945, Lively was sent to live with her grandmothers in England.

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NWPR Books
6:43 am
Mon March 17, 2014

A Circle Of Spies Hit The Road, Filling A 'Dossier' Of Mystery

iStockphoto

A few years ago, I spent the winter in Germany, teaching at Leipzig University. I'd never taught before, and it was exciting, particularly because one of the classes I'd come up with was a survey course on spy novels. The class filled up quickly — those resourceful Leipzig students recognized an easy A when they saw it — and I was eager to share the best of an often-maligned genre with them. We looked at W. Somerset Maugham's Ashenden stories, Eric Ambler, Graham Greene, John le Carre, Len Deighton, and Alan Furst.

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NWPR Books
3:08 pm
Sun March 16, 2014

Novel Reflects Desperate But Futile Search For Answers

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 3:35 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath.

All week, NPR has been reporting on the missing Malaysia Airlines flight 370. And to help us make sense of the news, we turn now to literature. Here's author Jonathan Evison.

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NWPR Books
12:03 pm
Sun March 16, 2014

'Rebel Music': When Hip-Hop Met Islam

Hip hop pioneer Afrika Bambaataa at a press conference in 2006. His Zulu Nation group, formed in the 1970s to combat street violence, soon began incorporating Nation of Islam teachings in its rhetoric.
Scott Gries Getty Images

Hisham Aidi's new book is a sort of musical tour around the world. It's called Rebel Music: Race, Empire, and the New Muslim Youth Culture. From hip-hop in Brazilian favelas, to Pakistani punk rock, to Gnawa-reggae in North Africa, it's a look at young urban Muslims and the music they make and listen to.

Speaking with NPR's Rachel Martin, Aidi recalls meeting a French band called 3ème Oeil — "Third Eye" — at a music festival in the Bronx, the birthplace of hip-hop.

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NWPR Books
2:00 am
Sat March 15, 2014

A Tragic Disappearance (Mostly) Solved In 'Savage Harvest'

Courtesy of HarperCollins

Originally published on Sat March 15, 2014 8:32 am

The disappearance of Michael Rockefeller in November of 1961 was an international incident; Rockeller, just 23, was the scion of one of the world's richest families. He had gone to New Guinea to collect native art for his father's newly founded Museum of Primitive Art in New York — and then, he had vanished.

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NWPR Books
2:26 pm
Fri March 14, 2014

Malaysia Flight 370 And The World's Attention

A Vietnamese Air Force plane returns from a search operation over Vietnam's southern sea.
HOANG DINH NAM AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 14, 2014 3:33 pm

It's been a week since the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines flight 370, a week filled with misinformation, wild theorizing and the anxiety of the passengers' families. The story, and especially its lack of information, has the world watching and wondering.

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NWPR Books
5:15 am
Fri March 14, 2014

Book News: Children's Books From North Korean Dictators?

Kim Jong Il (right) and his father, Kim Il Sung, are pictured on what is believed to be Paekdoo San, a mountain located along the Sino-North Korean border in this image released by the North Korean news agency in 1994.
AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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NWPR Books
2:16 am
Fri March 14, 2014

In 2009, 3 Americans Went For A Hike, And Ended Up In A Tehran Prison

Joshua Fattal (from left), Sarah Shourd and Shane Bauer were on a hike in 2009 when they unknowingly crossed a road that bordered to Iran. They were stopped by border patrol and imprisoned in Tehran.
Mia Nakano Courtesy of Houghton Mifflin

Originally published on Fri March 14, 2014 8:27 am

In the summer of 2009, three young Americans went for a hike. Shane Bauer and Sarah Shourd were living together in Syria, teaching and writing. Their friend Josh Fattal was visiting from the U.S. The three took a tour to a waterfall in the Kurdish highlands of Iraq, and as they hiked along a road that turned out to be the border with Iran, an armed man in uniform waved them over.

The next thing they knew, they had embarked on a two-year ordeal in the infamous Evin prison in Tehran. They join NPR's Renee Montagne to talk about their new memoir, A Sliver of Light.

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NWPR Books
3:02 pm
Thu March 13, 2014

When You Befriend A Killer, You Can't Not Write About It

In addition to Blood Will Out, Walter Kirn is the author of four works of fiction and one other work of nonfiction.
Beowulf Sheehan Courtesy of Liveright Publishing

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 8:07 am

Nonfiction writers often have to go scrounging for their dream subject. They may buy themselves a ticket to some far-flung place, or join an Iditarod team, or start researching a historical figure who seems to have led a colorful life. Sometimes, writers are fortunate enough to already have a personal passion for one subject, and writing a book about it seems only natural.

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Michael Weaver
1:02 pm
Thu March 13, 2014

Book News: Former Factory Worker Wins $100,000 Poetry Prize

Originally published on Thu March 13, 2014 4:24 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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