NWPR Books

NWPR Books
11:03 am
Mon March 31, 2014

We Read The Year's Best New Sci-Fi — So You Don't Have To

The 2014 Campbellian Anthology is a free download.

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 1:17 pm

The World Science Fiction Convention is a gathering of fans ranging from sci-fi movie buffs to gamers to comics aficionados — but at its heart, WorldCon is for lovers of literature, and it hosts the Hugo Awards, the Oscars of sci-fi and fantasy.

During the ceremony, one award is given that's not a Hugo: the John W Campbell Award for Best New Writer. The Campbell celebrates potential: Nominees are often young, just starting out in the field (though not always), and it serves as a kind of signpost for fans, pointing the way to the next great read.

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NWPR Books
8:54 am
Mon March 31, 2014

Dark, Remarkable Poems Show 'How To Dance' Amid Economic Despair

Courtesy of Greywolf Press

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 1:18 pm

Nick Lantz speaks from the failed and fallen heart of middle-class Americans, the everyday folks whose lives and bank accounts were gutted when the housing bubble burst. What does that heartbreak look like? Deeper and uglier than plunging stock market charts and foreclosure signs, and more personal. Welcome to an America in which ambition is turned upside down, where someone is likely to say, when asked what he's doing for work these days, "you know those cracks people fall through?/ We're the crack regulators, we keep/ those cracks up to code."

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NWPR Books
6:28 am
Mon March 31, 2014

Book News: Stock Market Is 'Rigged,' Author Michael Lewis Says

Michael Lewis' latest book, Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt, was released Monday.
Tabitha Soren

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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NWPR Books
2:59 pm
Sun March 30, 2014

A Libertarian With Roots In Rock Music

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We're going to hear now how a prominent libertarian found his political voice.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MARTIN: Matt Kibbe was just 13 when he fell under the spell of a certain rock band.

MATT KIBBE: Well, I was listening to a lot of Led Zeppelin, but it was the band Rush really got me starting to read and pay attention to ideas.

MARTIN: On the Rush album, "2112," the band sings of a futuristic society, in which thought and expression are controlled by a top-down autocracy.

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NWPR Books
2:06 pm
Sun March 30, 2014

In Civilian Snapshot Of Iraq, An Artist Is A 'Corpse Washer'

Courtesy of Yale University Press

In his latest novel, Iraqi author Sinan Antoon gives readers a stark portrait of contemporary Iraq. Originally written in Arabic and translated into English by Antoon himself, The Corpse Washer was nominated for the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize this year.

The book's protagonist is a young man named Jawad, an aspiring artist from a family of traditional Shiite corpse washers and shrouders in Baghdad. Jawad breaks from the family business and attends art school, where he devotes himself to the celebration of life rather than the ritual surrounding death.

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NWPR Books
11:58 am
Sun March 30, 2014

The Ides Of March Madness: 'Who's Gonna Stop Prospero?'

Paul Edward O'Brien, a stage actor, poet, and oncologist, delivered a Game Day-style analysis of how William Shakespeare's plays would match up in a tournament bracket.
Wesley Moore

Originally published on Sun March 30, 2014 1:16 pm

What if William Shakespeare's plays faced off in a tournament, like basketball squads spewing Elizabethan verse? That's the idea behind a bracket that pits 32 of the bard's plays against each another, in a contest arranged by New York's New Victory Theater.

Much like the NCAA basketball tournament that inspired it, the theater has been tallying votes and updating its bracket on its road to Stratford-upon-Avon.

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NWPR Books
4:40 am
Sun March 30, 2014

'A Small Player' On The Brink Of Self-Destruction

Originally published on Sun March 30, 2014 2:59 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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NWPR Books
4:03 am
Sun March 30, 2014

Miss Lonelyhearts No More: Three Surprising Books of Advice

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 1:20 pm

It amazes me that those of us who bridle at advice from people we know — parents, spouses, neighbors — crave it from those strangers we call authors. Stand in front of any magazine rack and gaze upon the endless lists of promises on the covers: advice on how to publish your first novel, lose weight, or put that spark back into your love life. Think of that corner in the bookstore devoted to "Self-improvement." Books with "how to" in the title — including my latest effort — number in the thousands.

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NWPR Books
4:13 pm
Sat March 29, 2014

Vladimir Putin Is Right Out Of A Russian Novel

Russian President Vladimir Putin stands in the shadow of the Fyodor Dostoyevsky monument in Dresden, Germany, 2006.
SEBASTIAN WILLNOW AFP/Getty Images

"Russia is a hypothetical culture. Ruled by despots for most of our history, we are used to living in fiction rather than reality," writes Nina L. Khrushcheva, who teaches international affairs at The New School. She is also the great granddaughter of the late communist leader of the Soviet Union, Nikita Khrushchev.

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NWPR Books
8:27 am
Sat March 29, 2014

A Grand Tradition Of Family Drama In 'Cavendon Hall'

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 9:33 am

Barbara Taylor Bradford is one of the best-selling authors in the world — and, proudly, a working stiff. She's written 29 novels, beginning with A Woman of Substance in 1979, which became one of the best-selling novels of all time. Her books have been published in more than 90 countries and 40 languages.

Her latest is Cavendon Hall, which takes its title from the great old Edwardian home shared by two families: the aristocratic Inghams and the Swanns, who've served the Inghams since time immemorial.

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