NWPR Books

NWPR Books
4:03 am
Sat April 26, 2014

For Binchy Fans, One Last Trip Down 'Chestnut Street'

There may be no real Chestnut Street in Dublin, but Maeve Binchy made readers feel as if it might be around any corner. Best-selling author Binchy, who died in 2012, was famous for novels which intertwined the lives, loves and relationships of her mostly Irish characters with a lyrical, yet accessible writing style. And Chestnut Street, her last book, is a collection of short stories about those characters, loosely connected by their common setting on the titular street

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NWPR Books
7:11 am
Fri April 25, 2014

Book News: Polish Poet With Mission To 'Create Poetry After Auschwitz' Dies

Polish writer Tadeusz Różewicz is pictured in 2010 in Lodz, Poland.
Grzegorz Michalowski EPA /LANDOV

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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NWPR Books
4:17 pm
Thu April 24, 2014

An Eater's-Eye View Of Literature's Most Iconic Meals

" 'Have some wine,' the March Hare said in an encouraging tone. Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea." (Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll)
Dinah Fried Courtesy of Harper Design

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 12:23 pm

In the opening pages of Daphne du Maurier's 1938 novel Rebecca, the narrator lays out a feast for the imagination: "Those dripping crumpets, I can see them now. Tiny crisp wedges of toast, and piping-hot, flaky scones. Sandwiches of unknown nature, mysteriously flavoured and quite delectable, and that very special gingerbread." Of course, the reader can't actually see these treats — and that's where graphic designer Dinah Fried comes in.

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NWPR Books
2:03 pm
Thu April 24, 2014

A Biography Of Your Cubicle: How This Became The Modern Workplace

empty cubicles
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 8:33 am

I remember my first office desk well. It was the roaring '90s in Manhattan. "Silicon Alley," they called it. I was fresh out of college, working at a Web design company. The office had an open layout. We all shared long tables. I did have a window that looked onto a stone wall. I was given a computer, a drawer and a fancy ergonomic chair.

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NWPR Books
5:09 am
Thu April 24, 2014

Book News: Happiness Study Says Library Trips Are As Good As A Pay Raise

Pedestrians walk past the main branch of the New York Public Library in New York City in this 2013 photo.
Seth Wenig AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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NWPR Books
4:03 am
Thu April 24, 2014

Mitterrand's Taste For 'Intrigue' And Contradiction

It's probably a little too pat to say that all successful political careers are marked by contradiction and compromise, though you're not likely to hear many objections to that characterization. Politics is a game of survival, and with a few sadly notable exceptions, unyielding purists seldom make it to the top.

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NWPR Books
8:17 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Book News: Gabriel García Márquez Left An Unpublished Manuscript

Writer Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in 1982, died last week at age 87.
Paco Junquera Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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NWPR Books
4:44 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Better (?) Living Through Chemistry In 'Afterparty'

The question you have to ask yourself is, how juicy do you like your science fiction?

And I mean that in terms of a spectrum. To me, classic space operas are saltines — dusty and dry and fit only as a calmative after a long binge of weirder, more foreign flavors. William Gibson? He's ... moist. Rudy Rucker is a juicy peach. Paul Di Filippo is that same peach, a week gone and with a tooth stuck in it.

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NWPR Books
3:48 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Book News: Ex-Supreme Court Justice Wants 6 Changes To Constitution

Former Supreme Court Associate Justice John Paul Stevens, pictured in 2013, has a laundry list of legal changes he'd like to see and thinks "ultimately each will be adopted."
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 5:21 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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NWPR Books
3:29 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

'Chameleon Club' Takes On Too Many Colors

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 11:10 am

The narrators of Francine Prose's novel Lovers at the Chameleon Club, Paris 1932 are not to be trusted. In describing the life of Lou Villars, French racecar driver, cross dresser and Gestapo torturer, Prose tells a complex story about the malleability of truth when everybody is a collaborator.

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