NWPR Books

NWPR Books
5:53 am
Tue April 29, 2014

'Nothing More To Lose' Forges A Connection To Palestine

Roughly halfway through Najwan Darwish's Nothing More to Lose, wiping awkwardly at tears and trying self-consciously not to sob with my partner in the room, I found myself wondering what someone with no connection to Palestine would make of it.

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NWPR Books
9:48 am
Mon April 28, 2014

Kim Harrison's 'Hollows': The Good, The Bad And The Badass

When my friend Margo suggested I read Kim Harrison's Dead Witch Walking, I was skeptical. Many were the conversations we'd had about the annoyance of fluffy modern-day vampires and the growing skeeze-factor of what got marketed as Urban Fantasy. But her recommendation carried a lot of weight, so on a quiet day in the independent bookstore where I worked, I sat down and entered Harrison's Hollows series.

Reader, I was hooked faster than a pixy caught in sticky silk.

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NWPR Books
9:36 am
Mon April 28, 2014

Book News: Tilting At Windmills? Radar Used To Search For Cervantes' Remains

Technicians sweep an area of the Convent of las Trinitarias Descalzas using ground-penetrating radar to search for the remains of Spanish writer Miguel de Cervantes four centuries after his death.
Gerard Julien AFP/Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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NWPR Books
3:45 pm
Sun April 27, 2014

Wise Words From Robin Roberts' Mom: 'Honey, Everybody's Got Something'

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 8:27 am

When Good Morning America co-anchor Robin Roberts was a little girl, whenever she'd complain to her mother about how unfair life was, her mother would say, "Oh, everybody's got something."

Years later, in 2007, Roberts was diagnosed with breast cancer. "I had that moment of: Wow, I can't believe I'm going through this. Why is this happening to me?" she tells NPR's Rachel Martin. "And my mother ... sweetly and gently — said to me, 'Honey, everybody's got something.' And it just really stuck with me."

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NWPR Books
2:44 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Put Up Your Dukes: Romance's Favorite Rank

Ever wonder why two-thirds of all the romance novels ever published seem to be about dukes? We do.

Snow White didn't fall in love with one of the dwarves. She fell in love with the prince. But princes are scarce, and the next title of any consequence is that of the duke – which explains a lot about the rows and rows of romance novels with the word "duke" somewhere on the cover.

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NWPR Books
4:12 pm
Sat April 26, 2014

In 'Every Day Is For The Thief,' Cole Chronicles A City's Reality

Nnamdi Azikiwe street, a commercial street in Lagos, Nigeria, Tuesday, 24 2005.
GEORGE OSODI ASSOCIATED PRESS

If you've ever received one of those emails claiming to be from someone in Nigeria, and telling you that millions of dollars await you, it may have been sent from an Internet cafe, the kind that proliferate in Lagos, Nigeria. There, under a sign warning patrons not to engage in fraud, people might sit typing emails that make outrageously fraudulent claims. Guards might be stationed in the cafe, and when they notice suspicious activity, they swoop down upon the offending patron, perhaps threatening him with torture and prison, and shaking him down for money.

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NWPR Books
2:19 pm
Sat April 26, 2014

How An Army Officer And Diplomat Wrote His Way Through Trauma

Ron Capps talks with refugees in the Kisna Reka refugee camp some 15 miles from Pristina, Kosovo, in 1998. In his role as a U.S. diplomatic monitor, Capps traveled through Kosovo gathering intelligence from refugees and Serb forces about the situation in the region.
Santiago Lyon AP

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 3:25 pm

In five wars over 10 years, Ron Capps shifted back and forth between being a U.S. Army officer and a State Department foreign service officer in some of the world's deadliest places.

In Afghanistan, Iraq and elsewhere, he served as a senior military intelligence officer. In wartime Kosovo, Darfur and Rwanda, he worked as a diplomat out in the field, documenting violence and war. As he writes in his new memoir, all the while he was almost daily "in the midst of murder, rape, the burning of villages, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ethnic cleaning or genocide."

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NWPR Books
8:30 am
Sat April 26, 2014

A Pixie Explores Vintage Porn In 'The Good Inn'

He was born Charles Thompson — but you might know him as Black Francis, frontman for legendary alternative band the Pixies. And though he still tours with the Pixies, he's trying his hand at a new art form: he's co-authored an illustrated novel, called The Good Inn.

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NWPR Books
6:28 am
Sat April 26, 2014

Justice Stevens: Six Little Ways To Change The Constitution

In a new book, former Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens says we should rewrite the Second Amendment, abolish the death penalty and restrict political campaign spending.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 8:30 am

Just a few words can hold a world of meaning. John Paul Stevens, the retired Supreme Court justice, has written a short new book in which he proposes a few words here and there that would create some sweeping changes.

The book, Six Amendments: How and Why We Should Change the Constitution, details the half-dozen ways Stevens thinks the Constitution could be improved, changes that he says are worth the trouble of the arduous amendment process.

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NWPR Books
4:51 am
Sat April 26, 2014

A Fire Sparks Rivalry And Suspicion In 'The Art Of Secrets'

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 8:30 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Saba Khan is a high school sophomore whose life is turned upside down in a flash - a mysterious fire that destroys her family's apartment on the North Side of Chicago. The Khans are Americans of Pakistani descent. Were they victims of a hate crime? Saba's high school rallies behind her family.

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