NWPR Books

NWPR Books
12:46 am
Tue April 23, 2013

For TV Networks, Stiff Competition To Be 'Top Of The Morning'

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Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 12:05 pm

Last spring, what NBC fondly refers to as "America's First Family" went through a very public divorce. Ann Curry, who spent more than a decade as a news anchor on the Today show and less than a year as a host, was unexpectedly axed. "For all of you who saw me as a groundbreaker," Curry said with emotion in her last morning broadcast, "I'm sorry I couldn't carry the ball over the finish line. But man, I did try."

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NWPR Books
2:51 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

What Does Modern Prejudice Look Like?

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Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 7:08 am

Harvard psychologist Mahzarin Banaji was once approached by a reporter for an interview. When Banaji heard the name of the magazine the reporter was writing for, she declined the interview: She didn't think much of the magazine and believed it portrayed research in psychology inaccurately.

But then the reporter said something that made her reconsider, Banaji recalled: "She said, 'You know, I used to be a student at Yale when you were there, and even though I didn't take a course with you, I do remember hearing about your work.' "

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NWPR Books
11:04 am
Mon April 22, 2013

'Zoobiquity': What Humans Can Learn From Animal Illness

Originally published on Wed April 24, 2013 8:05 am

Dr. Barbara Natterson-Horowitz, a cardiologist at the UCLA Medical Center, coined the term "zoobiquity" to describe the idea of looking to animals and the doctors who care for them to better understand human health. Veterinary medicine had not been on her radar at all until about 10 years ago. That's when she was asked to join the medical advisory board for the Los Angeles Zoo and she began hearing about "congestive heart failure in a gorilla or leukemia in a rhinoceros or breast cancer in a tiger or a lion."

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NWPR Books
6:40 am
Mon April 22, 2013

A British Intellectual's Mission 'To Create The Perfect Wife'

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Originally published on Tue April 30, 2013 5:01 pm

At least since Pygmalion prayed for his beautiful ivory statue to become a real woman, men have struggled to find a mate who is almost literally made for them. Today you can turn to any number of algorithm-based websites to find your romantic ideal; you can even special-order brides from faraway lands. But in Georgian England, one well-heeled young man sought out his perfect love in a rather shocking and unlikely place: an orphanage.

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NWPR Books
4:17 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Book News: E.L. Konigsburg, 'Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler' Author, Dies

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 9:04 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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NWPR Books
3:23 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

'Humanity' May Get Second Chance In Jean Thompson's New Novel

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In Jean Thompson's latest novel, The Humanity Project, humanity isn't doing so well and could use some help. Sean is a wayward carpenter whose bad luck with women turns into even worse luck: He's addicted to painkillers, and he and his teenage son Conner are facing eviction. Linnea is the teen survivor of a school shooting who travels west to California to live with a father she barely knows. Mrs. Foster is a wealthy woman who's taken to living with feral cats, and whose "Humanity Project" just might take a chance on people who thought they were out of luck.

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NWPR Books
1:56 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

For A Student Of Theology, Poetry Reverberates

Nate Klug is a poet, translator and candidate for ordained ministry in the United Church of Christ. He lives in New Haven, Conn., where he studies at Yale Divinity School.
Frank Brown Courtesy Nate Klug

April is National Poetry Month, and NPR is celebrating by asking young poets what poetry means to them. This week, Weekend Edition speaks with Nate Klug, whose poems have appeared in Poetry, Threepenny Review and other journals. Klug is also a master of divinity candidate at the Yale Divinity School and a candidate for ordination in the United Church of Christ. "It's nice to go home from a day of thinking about the church to this whole other world of poetry," he says. "But obviously there are some really amazing ways that they intersect."

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NWPR Books
1:56 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

Fire, Water, Air, Earth: Michael Pollan Gets Elemental In 'Cooked'

Penguin Press

In his systematic scrutiny of the modern American food chain, Michael Pollan has explored everything from the evolution of edible plants to the industrial agricultural complex. In his newest book, he charts territory closer to home — or rather, at home, in his kitchen.

Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation surveys how the four classical elements — fire, water, air and earth — transform plants and animals into food. Pollan joins NPR's Rachel Martin to discuss the merits of slow home cooking and his adventures in fermentation.

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NWPR Books
3:50 pm
Sat April 20, 2013

Kay Bailey Hutchison On Other 'Unflinching' Texan Women

George Ranch Historical Park

Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison knows what it means to be a pioneering female figure in her home state. In 1993, she became the first woman elected to represent Texas in the U.S. Senate.

Now, the former senator has written a book about the women who came before her, Unflinching Courage: Pioneering Women Who Shaped Texas.

In the book, Hutchison profiles several women who broke barriers and made history in the Lone Star State. Many of those women left a life of luxury and "moved to nothing," she tells All Things Considered host Jacki Lyden.

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NWPR Books
4:13 am
Fri April 19, 2013

Book News: Two Authors Make 'Time' List Of '100 Most Influential People'

Hilary Mantel attends the Costa Book of the Year awards in London, England.
Stuart Wilson Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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