NWPR Books

NWPR Books
6:29 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Start Storing Up: Indie Booksellers Pick Summer's Best Reads

Andrew Bannecker

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 1:06 pm

NPR's Susan Stamberg asked three of our go-to independent booksellers — Rona Brinlee of The BookMark in Neptune Beach, Fla.; Daniel Goldin of Boswell Book Co. in Milwaukee; and Lucia Silva, former book buyer at the now-closed Portrait of a Bookstore in Studio City, Calif. — to help fill our beach bags with good reads. What they came up with is a summer book list that's full of youth and ritual.

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NWPR Books
4:57 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Book News: Neruda's Death? Experts Say The Assassin Didn't Do It

Chilean poet Pablo Neruda arrives in Capri, Italy, in 1952.
Keystone Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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NWPR Books
4:03 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Food For Thought In Shriver's 'Big Brother'

iStockphoto.com

Lionel Shriver tackles a whopper of an issue in her new novel, Big Brother: obesity and the emotional connection between weight, consumption, guilt and control. She comes at this huge subject through a sister torn between saving her morbidly obese older brother, who has "buried himself in himself," and an unsympathetic, belligerently fit husband — a situation that raises questions about divided loyalties and whether blood is thicker than water. In this book, diet protein shakes are thicker than both.

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NWPR Books
12:28 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Book Explores Downfall Of An Indian-American Business Icon

Rajat Gupta, former Goldman Sachs director and former senior partner at McKinsey & Co., was sentenced to two years in prison for leaking inside information to hedge fund manager Raj Rajaratnam.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 5:10 am

Rajat Gupta was one of the wealthiest and most successful men in America and an icon of the Indian-American community. Today, he faces two years in prison for insider trading, convicted of passing corporate secrets to his billionaire friend and Galleon Group founder Raj Rajaratnam.

Gupta was already a wealthy man; what was the motive for his crime? In The Billionaire's Apprentice:The Rise of the Indian-American Elite and the Fall of the Galleon Hedge Fund, journalist Anita Raghavan tries to answer that question.

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NWPR Books
12:57 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

Hello Muddah, Hello Drama: The Brief Bloom Of Parodist Allan Sherman

Allan Sherman released three albums between October 1962 and August 1963.
Courtesy Robert Sherman

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 3:53 pm

The summertime novelty tune "Hello Muddah, Hello Fadduh" has been pouring out of radios for 50 years now. In late July of 1963, Billboard magazine reported that fans were "actually breaking down doors" of record stores to buy the song about the pains of summer camp.

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NWPR Books
10:10 am
Mon June 3, 2013

'Fairyland': A Girl Grows Up In San Francisco's Gay Community

W.W. Norton & Co.

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 6:58 am

While these days it's not uncommon to meet children with gay parents, in the 1970s it was. Alysia Abbott was one of those kids. When her parents met, her father — Steve Abbott — told her mother he was bisexual. But when Alysia was a toddler, her mother died in a car accident and Steve came out as gay. He moved with his daughter to San Francisco, just as the gay liberation movement was gaining strength.

While her father had not initially wanted a child, Abbott says he enjoyed spending time with her when she was a baby. Her mother's death brought the two of them even closer.

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NWPR Books
4:33 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Book News: Apple Vs. DOJ As Ebook Price-Fixing Trial Begins

An Apple store in Beijing, China opens.
Feng Li Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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NWPR Books
2:09 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Mapping 'The World' Of A Remote Afghan Village

In Oqa, Afghanistan, Boston weaves a saddlebag for her husband's donkey. The weavers of Oqa also weave large carpets, earning less than $1 a day for their work.
Courtesy Anna Badkhen

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 5:18 pm

When freelance journalist Anna Badkhen returned to Afghanistan in 2011, she set her eyes on a region so remote it doesn't exist on Google Maps.

In her new book, The World Is A Carpet: Four Seasons in an Afghan Village, Badkhen chronicles her time in Oqa - a rural, rainless village of 240 people and "40 doorless huts."

For many of its residents, survival hinges on the fingers of women and children. They engage in the local tradition of carpet weaving, earning about 40 cents a day for carpets that eventually sell for $5,000 to $20,000 abroad.

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NWPR Books
2:09 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Three-Minute Fiction Readings: 'Litter' And 'The Shirt'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 5:18 pm

NPR's Bob Mondello and Susan Stamberg read excerpts of two of the best submissions for Round 11 of our short story contest. They read Litter by Kalad Hovatter of Orange, Calif., and The Shirt by Jennifer Anderson of Shorewood, Wis. You can read their full stories below and find other stories on our Three-Minute Fiction page or on Facebook.

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NWPR Books
2:05 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Arthur Geisert's 'Thunderstorm' Celebrates Life On The Prairie

Arthur Geisert's Thunderstorm follows a tempest in the rural Midwest.
Enchanted Lion Books

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 8:39 am

Arthur Geisert is the author of more than two dozen children's picture books. Three of his titles have won The New York Times Best Illustrated Children's Book Award. He's most famous for his intricate illustrations of the Midwest — sprawling prairie, family farms and his signature mischievous pigs.

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