nuclear waste

Anna King / Northwest News Network

There’s got to be a better plan for leaking tanks of waste at Washington State’s Hanford Nuclear Reservation. That’s according to a new report by the federal Government Accountability Office.

Tobin Fricke / Wikimedia Commons

For the third time this week there are calls to protect workers from hazardous vapors at Hanford. This time from Washington’s congressional delegation.

Anna King / Northwest News Network

Thursday three groups with ties to the Hanford Nuclear Reservation announced they intend to sue the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractor.

Seattle-based watchdog group Hanford Challenge, a Richland workers’ union, and the Washington Physicians for Social Responsibility are piling on. They said there’s been a lack of action at the Hanford site to correct worker exposures to harmful tank vapors.

The groups notified Energy and Hanford contractor Washington River Protection Solutions about the intent to sue in 90 days.

Anna King / Northwest News Network

For decades workers at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in southeast Washington have been complaining of vapors from radioactive sludge. Workers at the tank farms say the fumes give them sore throats, headaches and dizziness. Now Washington State says it intends to sue the U.S. Department of Energy in 90 days if more isn’t done to protect these workers.

U.S. Department of Energy

Removing and disposing of contaminated soil is one of the biggest jobs at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation.

So when government officials announced this week they want to look into digging a bit shallower at the southeast Washington site, a lot of people took notice.

Department of Energy

Washington state and the federal government just gave themselves a 40-day deadline. They need a clear cleanup plan for leaking tanks of radioactive waste at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. If you think you’ve heard that before, it’s because you have.

Competition Seeks To Save Money At Hanford

Nov 25, 2013
U.S. Department of Energy

Managers at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation are looking for creative ways to save money at the southeast Washington site. They’re holding an idea competition with federal and contractor employees called the Grand Challenge. 

Washington's Governor calls a new proposal to phase-in portions of cleanup at Hanford an intriguing idea, but says it doesn’t solve immediate problems of leaking waste tanks.

Hanford Waste Plan Under Debate In New Mexico

Apr 4, 2013

CARLSBAD, N.M. - Last month, the U.S. Department of Energy announced a plan to send some nuclear waste from leaky storage tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation to southern New Mexico. The proposed new storage site is near Carlsbad and it's called the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. WIPP, as it’s known, has been prohibited from receiving Hanford tank waste for nearly a decade. Now, New Mexicans are debating whether to reverse course, and accept some of the waste.

RICHLAND, Wash. - The U.S. Department of Energy says its wants to send 3 million gallons of radioactive tank waste at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation to a storage site in New Mexico. That’s 3 million gallons out of a total of 56 million gallons of some of the most toxic stuff on earth.

But what is different about this waste in particular, and why some groups are against moving it to New Mexico?

At a recent news conference at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation, Washington Governor Jay Inslee said, “We have some good news here today.”

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