Northwest News

Northwest Public Radio is a participant and contributor in the Northwest News Network (N3), a collaboration of public radio stations in Washington, Oregon and Idaho. Our reporters bring a regional perspective to coverage of Northwest states' government, environment, economy, and other news of widespread interest to residents of the Northwest. Regional news on Northwest Public Radio is a part of Morning Edition every weekday morning, and All Things Considered in the afternoons.

Wikimedia user: TobinFricke / Wikimedia Commons

RICHLAND, Wash. – The Department of Energy is starting work on a plan to build a 30-mile natural gas pipeline to the Hanford Nuclear Reservation’s waste treatment plant. The announcement Monday includes few details but the pipeline would likely go under the Columbia River.

Hanford’s waste treatment plant is going to need a lot of power. After all, its purpose is to mix radioactive sludge with glass material to form molten liquid. That brew, once cooled, would form huge glass logs for long-term storage.

Austin Jenkins / Northwest News Network

OLYMPIA, Wash. – The number of people who are out of work in Washington is falling. It’s a sign the economy is recovering – albeit slowly. But it’s only been in the last two months that the government sector has started hiring again. Olympia Correspondent Austin Jenkins profiles one person who lost her state job, but found another one.

Keri-Anne Jetzer’s low point came last year when she lost her job as a researcher for Washington’s Sentencing Guidelines Commission.

Chris Lehman / Northwest News Network

SALEM, Ore. – Rising flood waters have led to evacuations and road closures in the Willamette Valley. In the town of Turner, city officials have encouraged all residents to evacuate. Shelters are open in Salem for those displaced by flood waters. Salem residents Mark and Andi Bean were eyeing the rising waters. They were filling up sandbags at a city of Salem maintenance facility.

Gus Van Vliet / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

EUGENE, OREGON - Three environmental groups intend to take Oregon's Department of Forestry to court over the effect logging has on a threatened seabird.

The marbled murrelet spends much of its time over the ocean – but it nests in older forests. The Center for Biological Diversity, Audubon Society of Portland, and Cascadia Wildlands argue that logging plans for three state forests would harm the bird's nesting habitat, in violation of the Endangered Species Act. 

OLYMPIA, Wash. – Supporters and opponents of gay marriage plan to descend on Washington’s capitol on Monday . That’s when House and Senate committees are scheduled to take public testimony on legislation to allow same-sex couples to marry. It now appears sponsors in the state Senate are just one vote shy of passage.

StoryCorps Northwest

In the United States there are an estimated 5.4 million people with Alzheimer's disease. Two thirds of those are women over the age of 65. Dorothee Lundgren was diagnosed with the disease at much younger age, she was 49. In this StoryCorps excerpt, her husband, Richard Lundgren talks with their son, David, about how the disease changed the marriage.

Hanford.gov / U.S. Department of Energy

RICHLAND, Wash. – The Hanford Nuclear Reservation’s tank farms in southeast Washington may have much more plutonium than earlier estimated. That’s according to a report by a Hanford contractor that’s just been leaked to public radio. As Anna King reports, At least one high-level Hanford official worries the findings could mean a massive waste treatment plant’s design might need to be altered.

SPOKANE, WA- The marchers at this year’s Martin Luther King Jr. Day Unity Parade seemed to forget about the frigid weather, and an attempted bomber at last year’s event. Spokane Public Radio’s Paige Browning attended the parade and reports.

Morrison: “I believe in the dream, and it lives”.

Marching for her sixth year in a row, Karen Morrison marched near the front of the parade, leading the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. At least 1,000 people marched this year, led by a Lewis and Clark High School marching band.

What happens if a timber harvest is a little more like a fire or windstorm that leaves patches of trees behind? And what happens if you don’t replant trees after logging? That’s what the Bureau of Land Management is proposing for a series of experimental timber sales in Southern Oregon. Amelia Templeton reports.

Climb into the hills east of Roseburg Oregon, and you’ll find patches of old growth forest—and a lot of old clear-cuts.

Year-end sales numbers are in and, in the corporate battle of the skies, Airbus has once again beaten Boeing.

The European jet maker said this morning that sales last year totaled 1,419 — or almost double the 805 sales Boeing posted last year.

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