Northwest News

Northwest Public Radio is a participant and contributor in the Northwest News Network (N3), a collaboration of public radio stations in Washington, Oregon and Idaho. Our reporters bring a regional perspective to coverage of Northwest states' government, environment, economy, and other news of widespread interest to residents of the Northwest. Regional news on Northwest Public Radio is a part of Morning Edition every weekday morning, and All Things Considered in the afternoons.

Four county governments in Oregon are still struggling enough that the state should continue to monitor their financial condition. That's according to a state audit released Tuesday.

Expect A Warm Summer, But Not As Hot As The Last One

Jun 14, 2016
Joel / Flickr

Yes, it is going to be a hot summer. Meteorologists are expecting above-average heat.

 

Now here’s the good news (sort of): It won’t be as hot as last year.

Kyra Buckley / KLCC

A gay nightclub in central Florida is now the scene of the worst mass shooting in U.S. history. The tragedy sent shock waves across the nation. Sunday afternoon, patrons of Eugene's only gay bar shared their grief.

Oregon lawmakers are hitting the road Monday to get a first-hand look at the state's traffic chokepoints. It's part of an effort to develop a transportation funding package for a vote in next year's legislative session.

Monday is Kirk Schulz’s first official day as the 11th president of Washington State University. In some brief public appearances across WSU’s campuses, the president’s wife has been greeting students and colleagues too.

And you can call both of them Dr. Schulz. Noel Schulz starts as an electrical engineering professor at Washington State in August.

Quinn Dombrowski / Flickr

Washington Governor Jay Inslee spoke at a vigil held in Seattle last night in response to the mass shootings in Orlando. Inslee said he was there to share the spirit of Washington- a statewide commitment to support the city of Orlando.

Ostrea Lurida / FLICKR Creative Commons

Native Olympia oysters are smaller than the larger, faster-growing Pacific oysters preferred by farmers. A study by Oregon State University professor George Waldbusser has found Olympia oysters make their shells much more slowly. That helps protect them from acidic water.

AUSTIN JENKINS / Northwest News Network

Parachutes and MASH tents might be the Northwest’s best hope in the face of a 9.0 earthquake and coastal tsunami. This week emergency responders in Washington, Oregon and Idaho are practicing for a subduction zone quake.

A day after tribal leaders and Governors in all 50 states received a letter from the Bureau of Indian Affairs, US Interior Secretary Sally Jewell paid a visit to the Spokane Indian Tribe.

Yakima Valley Emergency Management Office

If a 9.0 earthquake and tsunami hit Washington state, people in the central and eastern parts of the state would not be the hardest hit, but survival would not be a walk in the park either. That’s why emergency organizers east of the Cascade Mountains are preparing to handle that kind of disaster. 

Pages