Native Americans

Race Relations
5:11 pm
Mon July 14, 2014

Idaho Tribe Seeks Information On Vandals Behind 'White Power' Message

Vandals defaced a sign off Highway 95 on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation.
Credit Coeur d'Alene Tribe

The Coeur d'Alene Tribe in Idaho is asking for information that will lead to the person who wrote “white power” and other racist messages on a reservation historical marker over the weekend. The writing was discovered on a sign for a former mission site south of Plummer.

The message also included the words “die … Indians,” an expletive and what appear to be swastikas.

Groups that have worked to drive white supremacist elements out of north Idaho are condemning the act. Tony Stewart is one of the founders of the Kootenai County Task Force on Human Relations.

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Sealaska Corporation
6:36 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Native Corporation With Northwest Shareholders Picks New Leaders

Sealaska Board Chairman Joe Nelson poses at corpoartion headquarters in Juneau. Nelson was chosen as the new chairman following the corporation's annual meeting June 28 near Seattle.
Credit Ed Schoenfeld / Northwest News Network

A Native American-owned corporation with thousands of shareholders in the Pacific Northwest has new leadership. The Alaska-based business is trying to bounce back from heavy losses. CoastAlaska’s Ed Schoenfeld reports from Juneau.

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Native American Tribes
5:27 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Proposed Tribal Recognition Changes Hold Promise And Pitfalls

The U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs wants to rewrite the rules for when a native tribe is officially a tribe in the eyes of the federal government.
Credit Theodore Scott / Flickr

The U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs wants to rewrite the rules for when a native tribe is officially a tribe - in the eyes of the feds. This again raises hopes for status and federal benefits among some unrecognized tribes in the West. Those hopefuls still face a bumpy road.

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Klamath Basin Water
7:18 am
Tue July 1, 2014

Could An Alliance Of Tribes And Farmers Solve Klamath’s Water Woes?

The Klamath Basin spans northern California and southern Oregon and has seen frequent water crises between the farming, ranching, tribal and environmental communities.
Credit Devan Schwartz / EarthFix

Much of the West is entering a second straight summer of drought. In Southern Oregon’s Klamath Basin, ranchers are once again watching their pastureland go dry for a lack of water. That has them preparing to sell their livestock earlier – and for lower prices – than they’d like.

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Native American Tribal Map
1:15 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

The Map Of Native American Tribes You've Never Seen Before

Aaron Carapella, a self-taught mapmaker in Warner, Okla., has designed a map of Native American tribes showing their locations before first contact with Europeans.
Hansi Lo Wang NPR

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 4:14 pm

Finding an address on a map can be taken for granted in the age of GPS and smartphones. But centuries of forced relocation, disease and genocide have made it difficult to find where many Native American tribes once lived.

Aaron Carapella, a self-taught mapmaker in Warner, Okla., has pinpointed the locations and original names of hundreds of American Indian nations before their first contact with Europeans.

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Lamprey Ceremony
7:20 am
Tue June 3, 2014

Lamprey Fishing Blessing Ceremony Has Tribal Sovereignty Undertone

Children and tribal elders alike danced the eel dance at Clackamette Park on Monday.
Credit Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

You've no doubt heard people say they're "goin' fishin'." But how about going "eeling?" As in, fishing for eel.

For centuries, Native Americans from Boise to Wenatchee to the southern Oregon coast have harvested Pacific lamprey, colloquially called eels. Monday, the Warm Springs and Yakama tribes held a season-opening "blessing ceremony" at Willamette Falls. Correspondent Tom Banse reports the event happened against a backdrop of treaty rights tension over management of the dwindling fish.

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Native American History
7:31 am
Mon May 12, 2014

Gathering The Stories Of Northwest People "Left Out" Of History

Author LLyn De Danaan at home in Mason County, Washington.
Credit Mary Randlett

It started with the discovery of long-forgotten gravestones in a thicket of bramble and alder. That set one author on the faint trail of a feisty Native American woman and oyster farmer who lived in 19th century western Washington. The biographer is using the resulting book to inspire other Northwesterners - particularly tribal members. She wants to bring out the stories of people who, in her words, have been "left out of our histories." Correspondent Tom Banse reports from Oyster Bay in Mason County, Washington.

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Wanapum Dam Bones
5:28 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

Bones Found Near Wanapum Dam Repatriated To Northwest Tribes

File photo. Two skeletons were found several weeks ago along newly exposed Columbia River shore.
Credit Anna King / Northwest News Network

This week two skeletons found upstream of the cracked Wanapum Dam were handed over to Northwest tribes. The remains were found near each other several weeks ago along the newly exposed Columbia River shore.

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New Fish Shop
4:27 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

Native-Owned Fish Shop Opens In Cascade Locks, Oregon

Kim Brigham Campbell is opening a new fish market in Cascade Locks, Oregon at noon on Feb. 8.
Credit Anna King

In the recent past, native fishers have sold just-caught fish from coolers at near-river sites. But this weekend, a woman entrepreneur is opening the first brick and mortar, Native American family owned fish market along the Columbia River. 

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Native American Violence
6:31 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

UW Prof To Advise Justice Dept. On Children & Violence In Indian Country

A new Justice Department advisory panel will be specifically looking at violence faced by American Indian children.
Credit Rennett Stowe / Creative Commons

Tribal leaders from the Northwest and from around the country had the opportunity today to tell the Obama Administration what they want in the coming year. The White House convened what has become an annual conference with Native American tribes. A University of Washington law school professor will be giving advice all year long thanks to his appointment to a new Justice Department advisory panel. Ron Whitener says the group is specifically looking at violence faced by American Indian children.

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