Music + Culture

 

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Get in the holiday spirit with these special programs throughout December.

All programs on the NPR and Classical Music Service unless otherwise specified.

December 16, 8 PM: Celebrate the first day of Hanukkah on NWPR with stories of all sorts on Hanukkah Lights, hosted by Susan Stamberg and Murray Horwitz.

December 17, 8 PM: The Western Wind and narrator Leonard Nimoy will once again bring you Chanukah in Story and Song, filled with everything from Eastern European Yiddish melodies to modern Israeli tunes.

The words of the Stabat Mater come from an ancient Latin text describing Mary weeping at the cross over her son, Jesus. While the Catholic poem has been set to music by many — from Vivaldi to Arvo Pärt — three contemporary composers have put their own spin on the old verses.

Alissa Firsova was born in Moscow, but has lived in England since she was 4.

For all those who just can't bear to hear "Jingle Bell Rock" or any of the other Yuletide earworms that will invade shopping malls and radio waves in the coming months, Norway's Trio Mediaeval has some new old music for the holiday season.

Stuart Monk /iStockphoto.com

  Let Northwest Public Radio be part of your Thanksgiving celebration with these special programs this Thursday:

Lynne Rossetto-Kasper and a wonderful lineup of special guests take listener calls and provide some dinner-saving cooking tips on the live call-in show The Splendid Table’s Turkey Confidential, which you can hear Thanksgiving morning from 8-10 on NWPR’s NPR News service. 

A Flurry Of Premieres For American Orchestras

Nov 20, 2014

How about some good — even great — news from American orchestras? Today and tomorrow, four of the country's biggest ensembles are playing world premieres by prominent composers.

If you're a parent, the sound of a small child sawing away at the strains of the "Twinkle Variations" may be all too familiar.

It's Song One, of Book One, of the Suzuki method, a musical pedagogy developed by Shin'ichi Suzuki in the 1960s.

But lately there has been discord among music educators, a feud over methods and credentials and accusations of fraud.

Robert Lee Watt fell in love with the French horn at an early age. He met a lot of resistance from people who thought his background and his race made a career with the instrument unlikely — but he went on to become the first African-American French hornist hired by a major symphony in the United States.

He became the assistant first French horn for the Los Angeles Philharmonic in 1970, and stayed with the orchestra for 37 years. His memoir, The Black Horn, tells how he got there.

Ted Tremper

After graduating and becoming a successful up-and-coming comedian, why would you return to your old college? To teach, of course!  

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