Music + Culture

 

Steven Spielberg's film Lincoln has earned 12 Academy Award nominations, including best picture and best director. Another Spielberg film — the multi-Oscar winning Schindler's List — will be celebrating 20 years since its release. These films have at least two important things in common: Spielberg and publicist Marvin Levy.

If you're not counting the days until the release of Iron Man 3, if you're not sure who Kristen Stewart is, and if the last romantic comedy you saw starred Meryl Streep, you just may be over 50.

That's a segment of the moviegoing audience that may have been neglected once — but no more. A number of films appealing to older audiences, or films that have themes closely related to aging, have been scooping up nominations for Oscars and other awards.

Republished from WSUNews 

When Forbes magazine writer Connie Guglielmo received iTunes' list on the top 10 "must-own classical music” recordings of all time, it brought out the skeptic in her. So, she turned to Robin Rilette, Northwest Public Radio's music director, to review the list and give her professional opinion.  

Continue reading...

Programming Note: Sunday night, we'll be live-blogging the Academy Awards here at NPR.org, and the Wait Wait ... Don't Tell Me! team will be covering the red-carpet fashions, so be sure to join us to share your thoughts and see whether Affleck, Argo, and Daniel Day-Lewis have the big nights predicted for them.

Picture Rick's smoky cafe in Casablanca, Lincoln's office at the White House of the 1860s, or the Mos Eisley cantina on the desert planet of Tatooine: A production designer came up with the overall look of those movie sets. But the booze on Rick's bar or the pens on Lincoln's desk — it took a set decorator and a crew to make them look authentic and believable.

Violinist Joshua Bell has followed the lead of symphony orchestra conductors since he turned 7 and made his orchestra debut. But now he's the one waving the baton — or at least waving his violin bow. Bell recently took over the music directorship of the venerable Academy of St. Martin in the Fields.

This year is the bicentennial of Richard Wagner's birth. The man widely called the greatest living Wagnerian tenor is marking the occasion in style — and asking listeners who may have turned away from the German composer to give his music another chance.

Can You Learn To Like Music You Hate?

Feb 15, 2013

You hear some music you hate. That's fair. We all do on occasion. But can you learn to love — or at least not loathe — that music? Can you intentionally transform the visceral response you have to certain pieces and styles, or does that happen at some more incalculable, subtle level?

Researchers at Australia's University of Melbourne say that the more dissonance (which they describe as "perceived roughness, harshness, unpleasantness, or difficulty in listening to the sound") that we hear in music, the less we enjoy said music. Seems obvious enough, right?

Jailhouse Bach

Feb 15, 2013

Got an idea for a classical cartoon or a reaction to this one? Leave your thoughts in the comments section.

Pablo Helguera is a New York-based artist working with sculpture, drawing, photography and performance. His new book is Helguera's Artunes. You can see more of his work at Artworld Salon and on his own site.

Ah, the joys of Monday morning quarterbacking, classical style.

All programs on the NPR and Classical Music service unless otherwise noted

Sunday 12/30

A Season’s Griot                                                                   

6-7 PM

A Seasons’ Griot captures the flavor of Kwanzaa with tales and traditions of African-American and African peoples. 

Tuesday, 1/1/2013

New Year’s Day From Vienna

A New Season Of Classical Concerts

Sep 6, 2012

Northwest symphonies and chamber groups are gearing up for an exciting 2012/2013 season! Here are just a few of the great classical music performances you can enjoy in coming months around the region:

Moscow: Chanticleer, the American male vocal ensemble dubbed an "Orchestra of Voices," (pictured left) is coming to Moscow, in October as part of the Auditorium Chamber Music Series.

Yesterday was the first day of the Television Critics Association press tour, when TV reporters and critics descend upon Beverly Hills to hear about what's to come in the next six or eight months. We'll hear from all the big broadcast networks and most of the big (and not-so-big) cable outlets, but we're starting this year with PBS.

Candidly, not all the critics are showing up for PBS — not all of them write about it very much. It's a shame, though, because yesterday may have been, on the whole, the liveliest day I've ever had at press tour.

Travel With Garrison Keillor: The Gig Of A Lifetime

Jul 18, 2012

Republished from WSUNews

Band members were grinning as their raucous beer medley swung its way around the audience seated in the St. Louis Fox Theatre. Polka music flirted and twirled. Fiddle player Richard Kriehn raised his violin to take a solo, but in that moment, his bow slipped and snagged itself on the violin microphone. With four million listeners also tuned in via National Public Radio, crunching and screeching filled the air as Kriehn struggled to pry the bow loose.

Photo courtesy Washington State University

Republished from WSUNews

 

PULLMAN, Wash. - I swim laps at noon several times a week. I enjoy the water, and the gentle exercise is good for my aging joints.

We hold this truth to be self-evident: America loves pie. We, the people, a nation of bakers and eaters, value the art of creating that crispy, gooey, fluffy, fruity dessert — and each region reserves the right to bake the treat in its own individual style.

Summer is Pie Time!

Jun 27, 2012
USDA

With fresh fruits and vegetables in abundance, and the convenience of taking a pie along for a picnic, summer is definitely pie time! Staff at Northwest Public Radio took a few minutes out of their work to share with us pies both savory and sweet.

Grab your picnic basket, blanket and chair and get ready for a great season of summer music festivals around the Northwest! Events range from indoor concerts in theaters and concert halls, to alfresco events set amid the region's breathtaking natural beauty. With a multitude of festivals to choose from, you'll need a scorecard to keep track! Here are some to check out:

Olympic Music Festival  Performances in June, July & August 

Sharing Our Summer Recipes

Jun 3, 2012
Agricultural Research Services, Norsk Power, Paul J. Dauenhauer, Cameron Nordholm

Ah, summer time... when you can smell barbecue cooking and see picnic baskets on blankets in the grass.  These are the times in the northwest when we gather with friends and family to enjoy the great outdoors, good company, and good food.  With this in mind we asked the diligent folks at Northwest Public Radio to let you in on some of their favorite delicacies they like to take to a bbq or picnic:

____________________________

Beer Can Chicken

By Sandi Billings, Major Gifts Officer

1 whole chicken

Classical Countdown - Top 50 Montage

May 31, 2012

You can relive this spring's Classical Countdown, with this audio montage!

Click to hear the streaming audio above, or download the file (48 mb) here.

 

The winners' playlist, in order:

 

Here's what you've heard on Northwest Public Radio's Classical Countdown so far....

#50 - Arvo Part - Spiegel Im Spiegel

#49 - Nino Rota - Music from the Films of Federico Fellini

#48 - Ariel Ramirez - Missa Criolla (Creole Mass)

A wooden sled. A weapon to vanquish a villain. Indiana Jones' whip, the Maltese Falcon — even Babe the pig. In the movies, if an actor touches it, it's a prop. And if it's a prop, a property master arranged for it to be there.

On the set of Disney's upcoming reboot The Muppets — a Muppet, by the way, is not a prop — it's prop master Trish Gallaher Glenn who provided the telephone for Kermit the Frog. But not the very old typewriter on Kermit's desk.

In the old days, movies — even the big epics — were shot on studio back lots. Tara, that iconic Gone With the Wind plantation, was made of plywood and papier maché.

These days, movie locations are mostly real, though. And they're found by location scouts, who are often the first people hired for a film.

Should be easy work, right? You drive around town, spot a house you think could work for a film, drive back home? Not quite.

The Classical Countdown - What will be #1?

May 9, 2012

Your Classical Countdown is underway on our way to your number one favorite on May 24th!  Stay tuned as Robin Rilette, Steve Reeder and Phil Venditti share a list that includes some beloved favorites and some true surprises!

Audiences warmly received the Yakima Symphony Orchestra's first fully-staged opera production, The Marriage of Figaro. Directed by Kenneth Cox, undergraduate and graduate students from the University of Denver's Lamont School of Music gave a dynamic performance of Mozart's comic opera to many rounds of applause and standing ovations.

This Saturday, April 21st will be the world wide observance of Record Store Day. The idea of celebrating independently owned record stores and artists has been going on for 5 years. At the same time there’s been an increase in listening to music on vinyl.

With the 100th anniversary of the tragic sinking of the Titanic approaching this Saturday, April 14, the Wenatchee Valley Symphony and the Yakima Symphony will each be commemorating the event with concerts that feature music from James Cameron's Academy Award-winning film Titanic.

 

The Classics Rock with the Bottom Line Duo

Apr 4, 2012
Photo by GH KIM Photography

From “Walk like an Egyptian” to “Flight of the Bumblebee” the Bottom Line Duo break down musical stereotypes with humor and artistry,  and they do it on recycled instruments!  Okay, the instruments are just plain old, but you get the idea.  You can catch this husband and wife, bass and cello duo at Englewood Christian Church in Yakima this Thursday afternoon, April 4th, at 1:30.  

Check out their cool rendition of "Walk Like an Egyptian."  The bass makes for a cool a percussive instrument!

Photo by Nigel Chadwick / Wikimedia Commons

Did you know London has a tempo of 122.86 beats per minute? So says musician David Byrne, of Talking Heads and solo career fame. Byrne’s new sound installation , titled “Get It Away,” builds a song around sampled sounds recorded in the city.

“It turned out that most of the sounds seemed to converge around a common rhythm,” Byrne says, “I let the sounds dictate the groove, the tempo, and then I simply played along.”

Tacoma Symphony Orchestra to Feature Faure's "Requiem"

Mar 29, 2012

The Tacoma Symphony Orchestra's concert on March 31, 2012 will be highlighted by the performance of Faure's Requiem. Despite changes to the orchestration of the work to incorporate a full orchestra three years after its debut in Paris, the TSO will present the piece in its original format.

If you feel like being surrounded by mystery, enchantment, and beauty then Lost In The Trees’ new album, A Church That Fits Our Needs is a stellar fit.  The album has a special feeling.  Like that moment when you’re shoe shopping and you find a pair that fits your foot in a perfect way.  That might be a strange comparison, but my heart rushes when I listen to this album.  The movement of every song on this album is impeccable, leaving you with a feeling of hope and wonder.  With the lush-like vocals, lyrics, and sounds of cellos, violin, viola, tuba, piano, guitar bass, and percuss

Pages