Music + Culture

 

David Glenn

Welcome to De-Composing: The Breakdown of Compositions - Northwest Public Radio's look into music of the region and how it was created.

Today, David Glenn chats about his work Sculpture Garden for Piano Quintet.

Its roots lie deep in the northwest - a Walla Walla composer with a commission from the Walla Walla Chamber Music Festival writing about Whitman College and the colorful works of art that can be seen throughout campus from many northwest artists.

John Massey Wright / Folger Shakespeare Library

This April marks the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death. Northwest Public Radio is paying tribute to the Bard through music inspired by his sonnets, comedies and tragedies. The works of William Shakespeare have crept into music in major and minor: they spawned overtures, ballets, operas, incidental music and many other classical works.

http://www.bachstadt-koethen.de/kunst-und-kultur/historisches-museum-und-bachgedenkstaette/die-fuersten-und-herzoege-von-anhalt-koethen/leopold-von-anhalt-koethen.html

Through much of history, composers depended on patrons for financial support or incentive to write the music we enjoy today. Browse through the slideshow above to see some of the best-known patrons - and remember that today, YOU are the most important patron of the arts, when you support Northwest Public Radio.

For Women's History Month 2016, Northwest Public Radio celebrated with a three hour special devoted to women in classical music history hosted by your weekday afternoon host, Gigi Yellen.

In case you missed it or you'd like to listen again, here it is.

HOUR 1

HOUR 2

HOUR 3

NWPR’s “Celebrate Women in Classical Music” PLAYLIST

HOUR 1
13:01
May Aufderheide - Dusty Rag                     
Virginia Eskin, piano
Northeastern 9003

Wikimedia Commons

The rich tradition of Irish music is celebrated every Saturday afternoon on The Thistle and Shamrock (2-3 PM, NPR & Classical music service). This St. Patrick’s Day, find out how Celtic traditions have found their way into classical music and film scores with these special programs:

Wikimedia Commons

All through March, you’ll hear stories, features and music recognizing the history and contributions of women. Among the programs we’re offering:

Wikimedia Commons

How do you celebrate Women’s History Month in classical music, when the genre's history names few women composers? At NWPR over the past year, one answer has been: find what music you can, and play it. Inspired by Women’s History Month 2015, we took on a challenge to program at least one piece by a woman composer each day.  Yes, it’s a token, but this month, we trade in those tokens for a reward.

Seattle Symphony

Congratulations, Seattle Symphony! Another Grammy! The 2016 Grammy award for best classical instrumental solo went to violinist Augustin Hadelich, for Dutilleux: Violin Concerto, L’Arbre Des Songes, with the Seattle Symphony conducted by Ludovic Morlot, a release on the orchestra's own label.

Seattle Symphony earned its first Grammy last year -- Best Contemporary Classical Composition -- for its recording of John Luther Adams's Become Ocean, a work SSO commissioned.

Carl Van Vechten / Library of Congress/Wikimedia Commons

All through February, you’ll hear stories, features and music recognizing the history and contributions of African Americans. Among the programs we’re offering:

Tuesday, February 16: Pike County, Ohio: As Black as We Wish to Be

In a tiny town in the Appalachian foothills, residents have shared the common bond of identifying as African-American - despite the fact that they look white. Racial lines have been blurred to invisibility, and people inside the same family can vehemently disagree about whether they are black or white. It can be tense and confusing. As a result, everyone’s choosing: Am I black? Am I mixed race? Or, am I white? Adding to the confusion, there’s a movement afoot to recognize their Native-American heritage. (NPR News service, 10-11 PM)

Olivier Strecker / Creative Commons

As the annual Academy Awards presentation approaches, we have a special interest in the five nominees for Best Original Score, a category recognized by the Oscars since 1934. Three of this year's composers are no strangers to this process - between them, they have 69 previous nominations. 

John Williams was awarded his 50th nomination for his score to the latest Star Wars film, The Force Awakens. He claimed the Academy Award back in 1977 for the first Star Wars movie.

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