movies

ALL CLASSICAL PUBLIC MEDIA

A classically trained Shakespearean actor and the BBC’s former Hollywood correspondent,  Edmund Stone is host of one a new program on the NPR and Classical music service. The Score is a weekly celebration of music in film.  

Wikimedia / http://en.wikipedia.org/

When it comes to motion pictures associated with Halloween--films that can really scare us--they can succeed in many ways. Sometimes a picture can literally shock us with its imagery; in other cases, it may disturb us (in an entertaining way, of course) on a deeper, purely psychological level. Here's a short list of Steve Reeder's personal favorites in the horror/supernatural vein. As an avid moviegoer, all of these continue to "haunt" him.

Psycho (USA, 1960)

Movies like The Dark Knight or the Harry Potter series are touted as blockbusters — big-budget spectacles sure to make box office bank.

And though wannabe blockbusters can — and do — flop, like the $120 million disappointment Speed Racer, big budget is still the way to go, according to Harvard Business School professor Anita Elberse.

Rain Rannu / Flickr

With another Halloween approaching, horror, thriller, and supernatural films
come to the fore.  Many of these pictures feature original music by composers
who have the gift for pushing our buttons and sending our pulses racing.

Bernard Herrmann, a frequent collaborator with director Alfred Hitchcock,
helped make history with his searing, astringent score for Psycho (1960).
Violins have never quite seemed the same.  Nor has taking a shower.

Theaters React To Colorado Shooting

Jul 20, 2012

In the wake of the movie theater shooting in Colorado, theater owners have to consider something many have given little thought to in the past. Security. One big company, AMC Theaters, said Friday it will ban costumes and masks from its 300-plus movie houses. And the National Association of Theater Owners says it’s reviewing all security procedures.

Photo by Jessica Robinson / Northwest News Network

This summer’s blockbuster line-up is teeming with highly anticipated names -- like Batman, Spiderman, and the Avengers. That’s good news for the people who run cinemas. But for many small theaters across the Northwest, opening weekend is becoming a struggle.

More movies are starting to come on hard drives instead of reels. So theaters must make a costly conversion to digital if they want to stay in the game. And, as Jessica Robinson reports, time is running out.