medical marijuana

The end is near for a veteran-owned medical marijuana dispensary in downtown Olympia. It’s a casualty of the state merging recreational and medical marijuana.

Photo Credit: O'Dea / WikiMedia Commons

Fewer green crosses. Potential marijuana seizures. Those are two implications of the July 1st deadline for Washington’s medical marijuana businesses to merge into the state-regulated system. The intent is to eliminate the “gray market” in medical marijuana.

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More than 200 new retail licenses for marijuana stores could become available in Washington state. It’s an effort to expand access for medical marijuana patients.

The license application window opens Monday for medical marijuana dispensaries in Washington state that want to continue to operate.

Amy Radil / KUOW

Washington could get lots more pot stores. State regulators will allow medical marijuana providers to seek retail licenses later this fall. There are no strict limits on how many new licenses could be granted, and there is no requirement that they focus on medical patients.

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Legal marijuana is a rapidly-growing reality. Four states, including Oregon and Washington, have legalized recreational use of the drug. Several more – including California – could well do so by the end of next year. Forty states have legalized it in some form for medicinal use.

Medical marijuana and veterans activists plan to march in Olympia Wednesday to celebrate the addition of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury to the list of conditions that qualify for medical cannabis in Washington.

The era of ubiquitous green cross marijuana dispensaries in Washington state is about to come to an end.

Washington Governor Jay Inslee said it’s time for the “Wild West” days of medical marijuana to come to an end.

It appears the days are numbered for Washington’s sprawling and largely unregulated medical marijuana marketplace.

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Friday morning, a group of Idaho senators will consider a bill to allow parents of children with severe epilepsy to access a treatment derived from cannabis. Idaho does not allow medical marijuana, but the oil has almost none of the chemical that makes pot users high.

Idaho Lawmakers Hear Testimony On Cannabis Oil

Mar 4, 2015
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Idaho lawmakers Wednesday morning heard more than two hours of testimony on a bill to allow people to treat epilepsy with an oil derived from cannabis.

The oil has very little of the chemical that causes marijuana’s high and is showing promise in controlling seizures in children with severe epilepsy.

Lawmakers on the Senate State Affairs Committee voted to put the bill on hold in order to amend it to satisfy concerns from law enforcement. But lawmakers seemed swayed by parents who made emotional appeals wanting to try the oil as a treatment option.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho lawmakers will introduce a bill Wednesday that will allow people to use some oils extracted from cannabis plants. Idaho currently does not allow any form of medical marijuana. But other states without medical pot have passed exemptions similar to this new bill.

Austin Jenkins / Northwest News Network

Thursday is Medical Cannabis Lobby Day at the Washington Capitol. State lawmakers say this is the year they will rein in the state’s “Wild West” medical pot industry.  But at least one dispensary owner fears he’ll go out of business as a result. And one of his customers – an Iraq War veteran - worries that regulation will price him out of his medication.

At a Tuesday news conference, King County prosecutor Dan Satterberg said Washington’s unregulated medical marijuana industry is “unworkable” and “needs to be fixed.

Idaho Could Legalize One Form Of Medical Marijuana

Jan 9, 2015

Legalizing marijuana in Idaho has been a complete no-go, even as its neighbors have started licensing pot dispensaries and retail shops.

Marijuana will be among the top agenda items when the Washington legislature convenes Monday.

John Rosman / OPB

This week, Oregon voters chose to legalize marijuana and to direct the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to draw up rules to tax pot and to keep it out of the hands of people under 21. Now regulators in Oregon have to figure out how to take the pot economy that’s been operating under their noses and turn it into a regulated market.

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Oregon is warning some unlicensed medical marijuana dispensaries to close their doors. This summer, the state has sent letters to nine storefront pot dealers ordering them to shut down.

Chris Lehman / Northwest News Network

The attempt to remove most of the city council in the southern Oregon city of Gold Hill fell short.

Anna King / Northwest News Network

State-licensed growers in Washington already have grown vast seas of marijuana plants under blinding lights. But much of that pot won’t be ready in time for stores’ grand openings in early July. Supply doesn't quite meet demand as correspondent Anna King reports.

Adam Cotterell / Northwest News Network

Unlike Washington and Oregon, Idaho doesn’t have any form of legal marijuana. In fact in 2013 Idaho lawmakers passed a resolution saying they would never support legalizing marijuana for any reason. But one year later, during the 2014 legislative session many of those same lawmakers held closed door discussions about creating an exception to the state’s strict anti-pot laws. As Adam Cotterell reports it was because of a Boise girl and her mom.

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Local governments in Oregon had until Thursday to enact a one-year moratorium on medical marijuana dispensaries. More than 150 cities and counties in Oregon have already taken advantage of the ability to ban them. One city has sued the state because they want to ban medical marijuana dispensaries in their jurisdiction permanently.

Oregon lawmakers are hashing out a compromise on whether to allow cities and counties to ban medical marijuana dispensaries.

Oregon launched its medical marijuana dispensary program Monday. Nearly 300 dispensary owners signed up at this first opportunity for a state license.

Northwest state and local governments continue to struggle with how to give birth to the new industry of legal marijuana sales.

One of the hottest topics before the Washington legislature this year is how to regulate the medical marijuana marketplace.

The deadline for public comment on proposed changes to the state's existing medical marijuana program is Wednesday.

Medical marijuana patients in Washington would have to register with the state and buy their medicine at specially licensed recreational pot stores. But they wouldn’t pay sales tax. State regulators Monday proposed a sweeping overhaul of Washington’s medical marijuana industry. Ezra Eickmeyer is with the Washington Cannabis Association. He says the proposed rules go too far.

Medical marijuana patients in Washington would have to register with the state if they don’t want to pay pot taxes.