marijuana legalization

Legal pot? Not so fast. That’s the message from a growing number of Washington cities.

Several municipalities are considering whether to pass a moratorium on pot-related businesses. Others – like Bellingham and Olympia – have already enacted temporary bans.

Richland, Pasco and Kennewick are just the latest Washington cities to consider moratoriums. But it’s not just more conservative eastern Washington communities. Liberal Bellingham and Olympia have said ‘time out’ when it comes to legal, recreational pot.

Austin Jenkins / Northwest News Network

The state of Washington has compiled a lengthy list of pesticides for marijuana growers to use, even though these chemicals are not officially approved for pot. The new list is part of the state’s ongoing effort to regulate the production of legal, recreational marijuana.


Washington state expects to adopt final rules for the structure governing legalized marijuana under I-502 by next week. So officials with the state’s Liquor Control Board are touring the state to get feedback before the rules take effect.

Washington Pot Czar Forecasts Victory Over Black Market

Aug 5, 2013
National Institute on Drug Abuse

Washington’s so-called “pot czar” says he thinks the state’s new legal marijuana industry could wipe out most of the black market. But he says officials haven’t laid the groundwork for the knockout blow. 

The stated goal of Washington’s new marijuana law is to stop treating adult pot use as a crime. But Washington’s pot consultant says this experiment in legalization will only work if the police aggressively target the black market. And he’s concerned that won’t happen.

The sponsors of Initiative 502 were clear. They said it was time for a “new approach” to marijuana in Washington. They wanted to allow adult pot use, free up law enforcement to focus on violent and property crimes and “take marijuana out of the hands of illegal drug organizations.”

In draft rules filed Wednesday, the Washington State Liquor Control Board laid out new rules for advertising, packaging and labeling marijuana. The rules forbid ads by “Joe Camel”-type cartoon characters. But they don’t restrict marijuana-infused gummy bears. 

Washington’s Liquor Control Board does not plan to limit how many retail licenses one person can obtain to sell marijuana. At least that’s the decision for now. The Board Wednesday issued its final draft rules for the state’s new recreational marijuana market.

Washington State Liquor Control Board

Washington’s official pot logo is out. Outdoor marijuana grows are in.


Licensed outdoor marijuana grows may be allowed in Washington after all. Staff at the state’s Liquor Control Board said Wednesday they’ve been persuaded by potential growers to consider alternatives to energy-intensive indoor pot production. Meanwhile, medical marijuana patients rallied at the state capitol in opposition possible new restrictions on them.

courtesy of the DEA

As Washington state moves toward licensing marijuana retail stores, a major concern for public health experts is preventing kids from eating marijuana. They are asking the state to ban marijuana-infused candy and other sweets, and require packaging and flavors that are less appealing to kids. KUOW’s Amy Radil reports.