Logging

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The Supreme Court today decided in favor of the timber industry in a case about the regulation of muddy waters that flow off logging roads. In a surprising move, one of the court’s conservative justices dissented, and sided with the environmentalists.

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A new study from the research arm of the Forest Service suggests that leaving behind broken branches and the tips of treetops after logging can help fight invasive species.

Mt Hood National Forest Withdraws Thinning Sale

Dec 12, 2012

The Mt. Hood National Forest has withdrawn a decision to thin trees in the upper Clackamas River watershed. Reporting for EarthFix, Amelia Templeton has the story.

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments Monday in a case from Oregon over water pollution from logging roads. Amelia Templeton of EarthFix reports a last minute rule change may have made the case moot.

Gus Van Vliet / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

A federal judge has granted a preliminary injunction halting 11 timber sales in Oregon’s state forests. The state is being sued by three conservation groups who say the logging projects imperil a federally protected seabird.

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Conservation groups are urging the Obama administration to keep logging restrictions in place for nearly 4 million acres of coastal forests in the Pacific Northwest. Otherwise, they say a threatened species of seabird could be at greater risk of extinction.

Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber has created a panel to try to end a stalemate over federal forest lands that once belonged to the corrupt Oregon and California railroad.

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The U.S. Supreme Court will not hear an appeal to the so-called Roadless Rule. The law bans development on nearly 60 million acres of national forest land.

Photo by Konrad Roeder / Wikimedia Commons

This is Front Page, our new segment featuring conversations with journalists taking a closer look at the people, issues and events shaping lives across the Pacific Northwest. Today we’re way out west, western Washington that is, where the twilight is unusual. The town of Forks. Here’s our news director John Paxson.

Logging roads crisscross thousands of streams in Northwest forests. At each crossing, runoff can spill into the water. A little mud doesn’t hurt. But a lot can choke fish and smother their eggs.

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