Livestock

Wash. Allows Wolf Kill After Sheep Depredation

Aug 21, 2014
Linda Stanley / Flickr

A rancher in northeastern Washington will be allowed to shoot wolves approaching his sheep herd. State officials made the decision after confirming wolves killed dozens of his sheep.

Cold Weather Challenges Ranchers And Dairies

Dec 5, 2013
Anna King

The region’s cold snap has many dairy operators and ranchers taking extra care with their livestock. When it’s cold, cattle and other types of livestock tend to eat more to stay warm.

Oregon wildlife managers approved a plan Friday to allow ranchers and wildlife enforcement officers to once again kill wolves that prey livestock. EarthFix reporter Aaron Kunz explains.

Oregon State University

A plan by the federal government to end protection for gray wolves received mixed reactions from environmental groups to ranchers. EarthFix reporter Aaron Kunz obtained a copy of that draft report and explains what it means for the Northwest.

Oregon State University

The federal government is preparing to stop protecting gray wolves in the lower 48 states, according to a draft document. The plan is drawing criticism from environmental groups. EarthFix reporter Aaron Kunz has more.


OLYMPIA, Wash. – It would be easier to kill gray wolves that attack livestock or pets under a bill that passed the Washington Senate Friday. Currently, ranchers and property owners can’t kill protected animals, like wolves, without the permission of the Department of Fish and Wildlife. The bill sparked heated debate in the Senate.

Republican state Sen. John Smith said the measure would allow people to defend their animals, including the dog his son loves.

Photo by Jessica Robinson / Northwest News Network

Washington wildlife managers are working to avoid the kind of escalation in wolf conflicts that led the state to kill an entire wolf pack last fall. Officials from the Department of Fish and Wildlife told a crowd in Spokane Valley Wednesday they’re trying to keep livestock losses down, even as Washington’s wolf population grows. Jessica Robinson has more.

Photo by: Gunnar Ries Amphibol / Wikimedia Commons

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has re-issued the kill order for four wolves in a pack in the Northeastern corner of the state. Starting Wednesday marksmen will take to the field, Ashley Ahearn reports.