Liquor Control Board

Cannabis Training University / Wikimedia

The Oregon Liquor Control Commission could get a more than $500,000 injection of emergency funds to help oversee the legalization of recreational marijuana.

That’s because starting next year, the OLCC won't be controlling just liquor anymore. Voters gave it the job of regulating pot, too.

Legal marijuana sales likely won't begin until early 2016. But the OLCC is about to embark on a lengthy rulemaking process for how marijuana can be grown and sold in the state. The agency wants to hire four new people right off the bat with more to come next year.

Washington’s Liquor Control Board has formally adopted 43 pages of rules for legal, recreational marijuana.

Le.Loup.Gris / Wikimedia Commons

Responding to federal concerns, the Washington State Liquor Control Board says it will change its rules on where marijuana retail stores can be located. The change aligns Washington state rules with federal law. Officials say that makes retail store owners less vulnerable to prosecution.

Austin Jenkins / Northwest News Network

The state of Washington has compiled a lengthy list of pesticides for marijuana growers to use, even though these chemicals are not officially approved for pot. The new list is part of the state’s ongoing effort to regulate the production of legal, recreational marijuana.

Vaporizers

Washington state expects to adopt final rules for the structure governing legalized marijuana under I-502 by next week. So officials with the state’s Liquor Control Board are touring the state to get feedback before the rules take effect.

Washington’s Liquor Control Board does not plan to limit how many retail licenses one person can obtain to sell marijuana. At least that’s the decision for now. The Board Wednesday issued its final draft rules for the state’s new recreational marijuana market.

Washington State Liquor Control Board

Washington’s official pot logo is out. Outdoor marijuana grows are in.

NWNews

Licensed outdoor marijuana grows may be allowed in Washington after all. Staff at the state’s Liquor Control Board said Wednesday they’ve been persuaded by potential growers to consider alternatives to energy-intensive indoor pot production. Meanwhile, medical marijuana patients rallied at the state capitol in opposition possible new restrictions on them.

courtesy of the DEA

As Washington state moves toward licensing marijuana retail stores, a major concern for public health experts is preventing kids from eating marijuana. They are asking the state to ban marijuana-infused candy and other sweets, and require packaging and flavors that are less appealing to kids. KUOW’s Amy Radil reports.

Washington’s Liquor Control Board has been inundated with feedback on its proposed marijuana regulations. The deadline to submit comments was Monday. The Board is writing the rules for legalized cannabis. Among the many concerns: the state’s new pot logo.

It’s called the Produced in Washington icon. It’s an outline of the state with a marijuana leaf in the middle. The idea was to require this label be affixed to any package containing marijuana sold at a retail store.

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