Liquor Control Board

Cannabis Training University / Wikimedia

The Oregon Liquor Control Commission could get a more than $500,000 injection of emergency funds to help oversee the legalization of recreational marijuana.

That’s because starting next year, the OLCC won't be controlling just liquor anymore. Voters gave it the job of regulating pot, too.

Legal marijuana sales likely won't begin until early 2016. But the OLCC is about to embark on a lengthy rulemaking process for how marijuana can be grown and sold in the state. The agency wants to hire four new people right off the bat with more to come next year.

Washington’s Liquor Control Board has formally adopted 43 pages of rules for legal, recreational marijuana.

Le.Loup.Gris / Wikimedia Commons

Responding to federal concerns, the Washington State Liquor Control Board says it will change its rules on where marijuana retail stores can be located. The change aligns Washington state rules with federal law. Officials say that makes retail store owners less vulnerable to prosecution.

Austin Jenkins / Northwest News Network

The state of Washington has compiled a lengthy list of pesticides for marijuana growers to use, even though these chemicals are not officially approved for pot. The new list is part of the state’s ongoing effort to regulate the production of legal, recreational marijuana.

Vaporizers

Washington state expects to adopt final rules for the structure governing legalized marijuana under I-502 by next week. So officials with the state’s Liquor Control Board are touring the state to get feedback before the rules take effect.

Washington’s Liquor Control Board does not plan to limit how many retail licenses one person can obtain to sell marijuana. At least that’s the decision for now. The Board Wednesday issued its final draft rules for the state’s new recreational marijuana market.

Washington State Liquor Control Board

Washington’s official pot logo is out. Outdoor marijuana grows are in.

NWNews

Licensed outdoor marijuana grows may be allowed in Washington after all. Staff at the state’s Liquor Control Board said Wednesday they’ve been persuaded by potential growers to consider alternatives to energy-intensive indoor pot production. Meanwhile, medical marijuana patients rallied at the state capitol in opposition possible new restrictions on them.

courtesy of the DEA

As Washington state moves toward licensing marijuana retail stores, a major concern for public health experts is preventing kids from eating marijuana. They are asking the state to ban marijuana-infused candy and other sweets, and require packaging and flavors that are less appealing to kids. KUOW’s Amy Radil reports.

Washington’s Liquor Control Board has been inundated with feedback on its proposed marijuana regulations. The deadline to submit comments was Monday. The Board is writing the rules for legalized cannabis. Among the many concerns: the state’s new pot logo.

It’s called the Produced in Washington icon. It’s an outline of the state with a marijuana leaf in the middle. The idea was to require this label be affixed to any package containing marijuana sold at a retail store.

Washington’s Liquor Control Board has published 46-pages of proposed rules for the state’s new recreational marijuana market. But the regulations released Thursday are largely silent on two major issues: the number of business licenses that will be allowed and the size of marijuana grow operations.

The draft rules address marijuana producers, processors and retailers. On the production side, the Liquor Control Board proposes to ban outdoor marijuana grows. Pot would have to be grown within a fully enclosed secure indoor facility or greenhouse.

Small Stores Could Sell Liquor In Rural Washington

Mar 13, 2013

OLYMPIA, Wash. – The Washington Liquor Control Board is proposing a rule to allow small private liquor shops, but only if they are located at least 20 miles from the nearest retailer selling spirits. The draft rule unveiled Wednesday would clarify one part the voter-approved law privatizing liquor sales in Washington.

OLYMPIA, Wash. –Liquor control officers in Washington say they need more authority to combat the black market for booze, cigarettes and, soon, marijuana. State lawmakers on Tuesday will take testimony on a proposal to give full police powers to liquor enforcement officers.

Washington has 56 officers who police the stores and restaurants that sell liquor and tobacco products. Now that private retailers can sell booze, there are nearly three times as many liquor licenses statewide and theft has become a significant problem.

The deadline for marijuana experts seeking work has closed in Washington state. All bids to help the state set up its legal marijuana system had to be submitted by 2 p.m. Friday. State officials say the response was substantial. KUOW’s Amy Radil reports.

OLYMPIA, Wash. –The first public forum on how to implement Washington’s new marijuana law drew a capacity crowd Tuesday night in Olympia. The state’s Liquor Control Board is seeking input as it writes the rules for enacting Initiative 502 – Washington’s new pot legalization law.

They arrived early and in droves – the smell of marijuana clung in the air. First in line to get a seat for the forum was Leslie Tikka of Olympia. She mainly came to see a bit of history in the making.

Washington State Seeks Marijuana Experts

Jan 11, 2013
Rad Racer / Wikimedia

The Washington State Liquor Control Board is forging ahead in its new role creating access to legalized marijuana. On Jan. 14,  the board will issue a request for consultants to gauge pot consumption in Washington state.

Washington Liquor Sales Up Over Last Year

Dec 4, 2012
Decatur Wine & Spirits / Wikimedia Commons

There’s new data on the affect of liquor privatization in Washington. According to new numbers released Tuesday that capture the first four months of private liquor sales, sales by volume were up between June and September nearly 3 percent over the same period last year.

Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

The privatization of liquor sales in Washington this year is having an unintended side effect: increasing theft of booze. In Olympia Friday, lawmakers quizzed top managers of the state Liquor Control Board.

Northwest News Network

The embattled director of the Oregon Liquor Control Commission announced Tuesday that he'll retire next month. Gov. John Kitzhaber pressured Steve Pharo to step down earlier this year. But the liquor agency head refused until now.

OLCC / Oregon Liquor Control Commission

The embattled head of the Oregon Liquor Control Commission is downplaying an unusually public display of tension at the state agency he runs. Steve Pharo says the spat isn't affecting the OLCC's ability to do its job.

Governor John Kitzhaber has been pressuring Steve Pharo for months to step down as head of the agency that regulates alcohol sales in Oregon. Pharo has refused, saying he works at the pleasure of not the governor, but the five member board that oversees the OLCC.

Photo credit: Wikimedia user O'Dea / Wikimedia Commons

The state of Washington is preparing for a seismic shift this week in the way people buy liquor. A similar transition from state-controlled alcohol sales is not yet on the horizon in Oregon. But some in the industry hope that will change.

Washington voters initially rejected the idea of turning control of hard liquor sales over to the private sector. But last fall, an initiative to do just that passed by a wide margin after an expensive advertising campaign by Costco.

The retail giant isn't planning a similar ballot run in Oregon this year. Instead, grocery industry lobbyist Joe Gilliam says retailers will try their hand at convincing the Oregon legislature first. And he says the industry will simply point north for an example of what happens when lawmakers don't compromise.