legal marijuana

PUBLIC DOMAIN

 

When Oregon voters approved medical marijuana almost two decades ago, supporters assumed there’d be more research into it’s health benefits. 

People who legally buy marijuana in Oregon would enjoy a greater level of privacy under a measure headed for Gov. Kate Brown’s desk. The Oregon House Monday approved a bill that would stop cannabis retailers from recording personal information such as a customer's name, age or address.

As advocates for medical marijuana gather in Washington, D.C., on Friday for an annual conference, supporters of marijuana legalization are worried.

That's because new U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions has been making tough comments about the drug, and there's a lot of uncertainty about how the Trump administration will enforce federal law.

Over his 20 years in the U.S. Senate, Jeff Sessions made no secret of his disdain for marijuana. In his new job as the nation's top federal law enforcement officer, his position on marijuana has not moderated.

The governors of Oregon, Washington, Colorado and Alaska have written a joint letter to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin asking for forbearance with their marijuana policy experiments.

Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson said he’s “deeply disappointed” by comments President Trump’s spokesman made Thursday about legalized marijuana.

You won’t have to worry about unclear labels on any pot-infused sweets in Washington state after Valentine’s Day. A rule to help keep children from getting more than just a sugar high goes into full effect Tuesday.

Bill Would Raise Penalties For Toking In Public

Jan 31, 2017
Jennifer Martin / Wikimedia Commons

It’s legal to consume marijuana in Washington, but you can’t use it just anywhere. The law confines the legal use to people’s homes. Some would like to see that changed to allow some sort of public use. But for now, a Kennewick legislator proposes to go the other direction and increase the penalties for public use.

Amy Radil / KUOW

Donald Trump’s nominee for Attorney General famously said that “good people don’t smoke marijuana.”

Senator Jeff Sessions also said, “We need grownups in Washington to say marijuana is NOT the kind of thing that ought to be legalized.”

People in the marijuana business in Washington and Oregon are wondering how Sessions will act on those words.

Marijuana retailers began collecting a 25 percent tax on recreational marijuana sales starting in January. That money is adding up quickly.

Jennifer Martin / Wikimedia Commons

Most banks refuse to do transactions with marijuana businesses, because it's still illegal under federal law. Washington's 10th District Congressman Denny Heck is pushing legislation to change that. He'll meet with industry reps and law enforcement Tuesday to talk about the proposal.

Washington Could Open Up Pot Industry To Outside Money

May 17, 2016
Seattle City Council / Flickr

Wednesday, the Washington Liquor and Cannabis Board is scheduled to vote on opening the marijuana industry to out-of-state money. The idea to help increase cash flow to entrepreneurs with limited access to capital. 

A University of Washington study concluded about 30 football fields worth of marijuana are needed to serve the medical marijuana market in Washington. That translates to about two million square feet of canopy.

Currently, more than 12 million square feet are approved for production.

Is the tax on legal marijuana in Washington too high?

According to the Washington Traffic Safety Commission, fatal crashes involving drivers under the influence of marijuana have risen sharply since Washington voters legalized recreational pot in 2012.

Brett Levin / / FLICKR Creative Commons

Washington is the only state that’s legalized recreational pot, yet doesn’t let you grow your own. In Oregon you can grow up to four plants, other states allow up to six. A bill that could go before the state senate next session may change that.

A South Puget Sound tribe is planning a grand opening at 4:20 p.m. on Thursday for what it believes is the nation's first marijuana store on a reservation.

It takes a lot of electricity to grow marijuana indoors. Lights and ventilating fans are some of the biggest culprits.

The Washington State Patrol has a warning for drivers: it’s now illegal to have an open container of marijuana in the passenger compartments of vehicles.

The license application window opens Monday for medical marijuana dispensaries in Washington state that want to continue to operate.

A lot of people want to review marijuana for Oregon's largest newspaper. The Oregonian is looking for a freelance pot critic as recreational marijuana sales are set to begin next month.

Oregon Legal Pot Sales Begin October 1, Officially

Jul 29, 2015

Oregon marijuana dispensaries can begin selling marijuana as soon as October 1, under a law signed Tuesday by Governor Kate Brown.

Oregonians could be able to buy marijuana for recreational use much sooner than anticipated.

Marijuana sales and a recovering housing market should help boost Washington tax collections by more than $300 million over the next two years.

The future of marijuana policy in the Oregon legislature is still unclear.

There's a process in place now for Indian tribes and the state of Washington to jointly regulate marijuana should any tribes choose to legalize and sell it.

A panel of Oregon lawmakers will take a first look Wednesday at changes to Measure 91 -- the voter-approved legalization of recreational marijuana.

Hemp advocates have launched a renewed bid to make hemp farming lawful in Washington state.

Katherine Hitt Flickr

 

    

Oregon is gearing up for a year-long process of crafting regulations for recreational marijuana.

The Oregon Liquor Control Commission Tuesday hired Tom Burns to lead the agency's implementation of Measure 91, which allows adults in Oregon to grow, possess, and sell marijuana under state regulation.

Austin Jenkins / Northwest News Network

The U.S. Department of Justice this week opened the door to a legalized pot market on tribal land.

But many Northwest tribes appear to be in no rush to go in the direction of Oregon and Washington voters.

The Department of Justice said it will treat Indian tribes that legalize pot with the same hands-off prosecutorial approach that it has treated states with legal marijuana. That means there could be a potentially lucrative marijuana business on reservations even in states like Idaho, where pot remains illegal.

But the decision depends on the tribe.

Chris Lehman / Northwest News Network

Dozens of Oregon cities rushed to approve taxes on recreational marijuana before Oregon voters legalized it this fall. But it's not clear whether those revenues will ever materialize since Measure 91 seemingly rules out local taxes on pot.

Pages