Rowan Moore Gerety / Northwest News Network

Yakima voters made history Monday by electing two Latino candidates to a city council that has long wrestled with the implications of the city’s rapidly growing Latino population.

SounderBruce / / FLICKR Creative Commons

Neighborhoods where non-English speaking Latinos live, tend to have the most toxic air quality.

That’s according to new research out of Washington State University.

Concierto, WDAV Classical Public Radio

Frank Dominguez has been part of classical music on public radio for more than 20 years – experience he mixes with his Hispanic heritage to produce and host Concierto, the nation's first bilingual classical show which you now hear Sunday afternoons from 2 to 4 on your NPR and Classical Music Service.

Every week, Concierto takes a look at the deep roots Hispanic culture has in the classical genre and includes a roster of composers and musicians from all over the world.

Rowan Moore Gerety / Northwest Public Radio

“There will always be a part of you that simply doesn’t translate.”

That’s the slogan Target used in a new social media campaign with the hashtag #SinTraduccion, or “untranslatable.” The campaign is aimed at Hispanic millennials, a demographic Target—the nation’s fourth largest retailer—now counts as its core customer group.

By one estimate, the buying power of U.S. Latinos overall is three times what it was in the year 2000: $1.5 trillion and counting.

liz west / Flickr


A federal judge ruled against the City of Yakima in a voting rights challenge Tuesday, setting the stage for a new era in Central Washington politics. The ruling calls for an overhaul of Yakima’s City Council elections to better represent the will of Latino voters.

Judge Thomas Rice’s order followed his ruling last August that Yakima’s at-large City Council races suffocated the Latino vote. The city’s Latino population is over 40 percent and growing, yet no Latino has ever been elected to City Council.

Northwest Public Radio
Rowan Moore Gerety

December 12 is the biggest day of the year for St. Joseph’s church in Yakima. It’s standing room only as more than 1000 people gather to celebrate Mexico’s Patron Saint, la Virgen de Guadalupe.

After the service, a mariachi band serenades the congregation. Volunteers serve up Menudo and Mexican hot chocolate. There’s only one thing missing: parishioners who attend the English mass.

Though the Catholic Church has long been known as a haven for immigrants, many parishes remain divided along ethnic lines even after decades of demographic change.

Mel Green / Flickr

Last month, a federal judge ruled that Yakima’s City Council elections stifle the voice of Latino voters in the city. But that verdict doesn’t apply to dozens of other places in Eastern Washington where Latinos are just as underrepresented in elected office.

In communities like Othello, leaders are grappling with broader problems of civic education and participation in local government.

Courtney Flatt / EarthFix

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is trying to get more Hispanic people fishing. And they’d like to get them to buy fishing licenses. That’d produce more revenue for the state. For EarthFix, Courtney Flatt has more.

Outside the concert hall at Occidental College, in Los Angeles' Eagle Rock neighborhood, children are invited to test out the instruments the Santa Cecilia Orchestra will play later. Alexa Media Rodriguez, 8, says she and her family have never before been to an orchestra concert. She heard about the orchestra when some of the musicians visited her school.

"I brought my dad, my stepmom," she says, "my sister, my brother and my sister's cousin ..."

That's the thing about this orchestra, says conductor Sonia Marie De Leon De Vega: The children are bringing the parents.

Like most sitting Supreme Court justices, Sonia Sotomayor is circumspect when talking about the court; but she has written intimately about her personal life — more so than is customary for a Supreme Court justice.

"When I was nominated by the president for this position, it became very clear to me that many people in the public were interested in my life and the challenges I had faced," she tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "... And I also realized that much of the public perception of who I was and what had happened to me was not quite complete."