immigration

Chuck Taylor / Flickr

Demonstrations went underway Friday in Seattle's Central District as part of annual May Day protests for workers and immigrant rights.

Alex Bautista is with the group El Centro de la Raza.

He said Friday's gathering was to raise awareness of immigration policy reform. He worried some ralliers had a different goal.

User "Atomic Taco" / Flickr

Last summer, a record number of migrant children arrived alone on the southern U.S. border. This crisis has a ripple effect in Washington. It’s one of the dozen or so states with a foster care program for some of these border kids. But homes for them are in short supply.

Tracie Hall / Flickr

A federal judge in Seattle Friday heard arguments in a potentially far-reaching immigration case. At issue was whether children who face deportation alone are entitled to an attorney, at the government’s expense. 

There’s a rising trend of children coming alone to the U.S., unlawfully crossing the southern border.

Most are from Mexico and Central America. They’re officially called ‘unaccompanied minors’.

Light Brigading / Flickr

Friday morning in Seattle, a federal hearing will resume that could have a bearing on immigration cases across the country. The central question is whether children who face deportation have the right to a government-provided attorney.

Earlier this week, a 12-year old girl with a bright red bow in her hair, sat before an immigration judge in Seattle. She quietly told the judge her age. But her twin brother was more shy. The judge explained the government is seeking to deport them. Then, he scheduled their hearing for a later date, to give them time to find a lawyer.

The congressional wrangling over immigration policy -- which threatens to cut off Homeland Security money later this week -- is spilling over to the Washington State Capitol in a fashion.

Lynne Sladky / Associated Press

Rosalinda Guillen heads Community to Community Development, a group that advocates for farmworker rights. She said she doesn’t know how many of them in Washington state President Obama's deportation change will apply to, but nationally the estimate is about 250,000.

“We are really concerned about the number of farmworkers that will actually qualify under this executive action and then whether there’s going to be real relief so that the agricultural industry has what they’ve been asking for all along, quote unquote, a legal workforce,” Guillen said.

AP Images

Idaho and Oregon have the highest share of unauthorized immigrants who will benefit from President Obama’s recent executive action. That’s according to a report from the Pew Research Center.

46 percent of Idaho’s and 43 percent of Oregon’s undocumented immigrants are newly eligible for deportation protection. The program Obama announced last month extends protection to people who have been in the country for more than five years and have children born in the U.S. D’Vera Cohn from the Pew Research Center says that describes many of Oregon’s 120,000 unauthorized immigrants.

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development & National Fair Housing Alliance

Even as the White House moves to announce an executive order overhauling American immigration policy, many people who bought houses while living here illegally will continue to face fallout from unorthodox real estate deals. Historically, undocumented immigrants have had few options for formal financing, leading to informal arrangements with some risky consequences.

After an early morning shift at the warehouse where she packs apples, Maria rests her elbows on the kitchen counter of her tidy home in the Yakima Valley.

Oregonians Reject Driver Card Measure

Nov 5, 2014
Oregon DMV

Tuesday Oregon voters rejected Measure 88, a referendum that would have allowed driver cards for Oregonians who can’t prove they’re in the country legally.

Ethiopian Athletes Likely to Seek Asylum in US

Aug 19, 2014
TexasEagle / Flickr

Police reports show at least one of the four Ethiopian athletes who went missing after the World Junior Championships in Eugene last month planned to seek asylum.

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