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Jessica Robinson / Northwest News Network

A federal appeals court Thursday upheld gay marriage bans in Kentucky, Tennessee, Ohio and Michigan. It’s a break with the trend in most courts.

That could provide a legal opening for Idaho Governor Butch Otter, who has vowed to continue the fight against gay marriage in his state. The issue may have even helped him win re-election.


The squeaker in the statewide returns from Tuesday’s election in Idaho was the contest for state superintendent of public instruction. The position rarely makes the holder a household name. But as correspondent Jessica Robinson reports, it's an office that's expected to play a key role in Idaho over the next several years.

Republican Sherri Ybarra’s margin of victory was just over 1 percent. She’s currently the curriculum director in the Mountain Home district. Ybarra says her first step will be getting a crash course from outgoing state schools chief, Tom Luna.

Joe Shlabotnik / Flickr

It’s election week. Here in the Northwest, Washington and Oregon voters will cast their ballots by mail – or drop box. In Idaho, most voters still go to the polls.

A.J. Balukoff /

Balukoff began the hour-and-a-half back-and-forth by introducing himself as a successful businessman and longtime Boise school trustee. Otter touted his administration’s fiscal responsibility, and Bujak attempted to paint himself as an alternative candidate who would change the way Idaho government works.

By the end of the forum, the three had touched on Idaho’s economy, school funding, the state of its roads and bridges, a prison scandal, and more.

Danielle / Flickr


Religious conservatives around the country are rallying to the defense of a wedding chapel in north Idaho whose owners don’t want to perform gay marriages. The mayor of Coeur d’Alene and governor of Idaho are being inundated by hundreds of calls and thousands of emails even though neither has taken any action against the wedding chapel.

The quaint Old West style wedding chapel called the Hitching Post is just across the street from the county courthouse in Coeur d’Alene.

Jessica Robinson / Northwest News Network

Same-sex couples across Idaho headed to county courthouses Wednesday. It was the first official day of legal gay marriage in the state since a court overturned Idaho’s ban on same-sex marriage. Gay rights supporters hope the day marks a new direction for Idaho.

In Boise, there was a long line of couples at the Ada County courthouse among them, some of the plaintiffs who took the state to court for refusing to marry them.

Philippa Willitts / flickr

The Idaho attorney general has asked his legal staff to start looking at what implications gay marriage will have for the state. Same-sex marriage is set to start Wednesday morning in Idaho under an order from the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. The county clerk’s office isn’t the only place where the ruling is expected to take effect.  

Laura Flowers

Same-sex couples in Idaho can start getting married and have those marriages legally recognized by the state starting Wednesday morning, according to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. Idaho’s attorney general decided not to pursue further delay.

Philippa Willitts / Flickr

Couples gathered at courthouses around the state early Wednesday. They were acting on a decision from the San Francisco-based appeals court the night before that essentially green-lighted the issuance of marriage licenses to gay couples.

In Boise, the Ada County courthouse opened at 8 o’clock. Enthusiastic couples streamed inside. But by the time they’d reached the Clerk of Court’s office, things had changed. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy stepped in and issued a stay on the circuit court’s ruling. Gay couples were turned away.