history

Seattle World's Fair
6:52 am
Fri October 19, 2012

Souvenirs Of Seattle's World's Fair

Six-year-old Paula Jones was the 9-millionth visitor to the Seattle World's Fair. She was given free admission to all of the rides, as long as she wore this sign around her neck.
Photo courtesy/Washington State Archives, Puget Sound Regional Branch

Fifty years ago Sunday, the Seattle World’s Fair came to an end. For six months nearly 10 million people visited the Century 21 Exposition. The Space-Age themed fair left behind many memories and a lot of memorabilia. In the final part of our series on the Seattle World’s fair, produced with Jack Straw Productions, Harriet Baskas looks at some of the stories behind the souvenirs.

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Kennewick Man
6:31 am
Thu October 11, 2012

Buff Kennewick Man Had Coastal Diet

Final Kennewick Man facial reconstruction.
Photo by Brittney Tatchell Northwest News Network

For nearly a decade, scientists and Northwest tribes fought bitterly over whether to bury or study the 9,500 year old bones known as Kennewick Man. Now, after years of careful examination, scientists are releasing some of their findings to tribes at meetings this week in Central Washington. As correspondent Anna King reports, Kennewick Man grew up on the coast.

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Mental Hospital Museum
6:45 am
Tue October 2, 2012

Museum Opens At "Cuckoo's Nest" Film Site

One section of the museum includes props used in the movie "One Flew Over the Cuckoos's Nest," including this hydrotherapy unit that appeared in several key scenes.
Photo by Chris Lehman Northwest News Network

A 130-year-old mental institution might seem like an odd place for a museum. But historians and mental health advocates have fought to preserve and tell the Oregon State Hospital's long and sordid history.

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Opium Paraphernalia
6:06 am
Wed September 26, 2012

University Of Idaho Gets Big Collection Of Opium-Smoking Paraphernalia

Donor Steven Martin and UI curator Priscilla Wegars hold antique opium pipes.
Photo by Tom Banse Northwest News Network

The "world's most comprehensive collection" of opium smoking paraphernalia has a new home; it's at the University of Idaho. A writer and collector, originally from San Diego, donated the exquisite antiques. Correspondent Tom Banse has the intriguing back story of how these so-called "instruments of self-destruction" came to a small Northwest town.

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World War II Flag
5:55 am
Mon August 13, 2012

Washington Veteran Having Difficulty Repatriating Captured War Flag

Close-up of "good luck flag," known as hinomaru yosegaki in Japanese.
Photo by Tom Banse Northwest News Network

Wednesday will mark the 67th anniversary of the Japanese surrender to end World War Two. With each passing anniversary, there are fewer and fewer living witnesses to the event. Correspondent Tom Banse reports time is also running low for an aging U.S. Marine veteran who wants to return a captured Japanese war flag.

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Hanford Nuclear Reactor
6:01 am
Mon July 9, 2012

Hanford's B Reactor Could Help Remember History, Spur Economy

In this photo from World War II, B Reactor can be seen between the water towers on the right side of the photo, along with other facilities that supported the reactor.
Photo courtesy U.S. Department of Energy

U.S. Senator Maria Cantwell made a visit to Richland, Washington Friday to highlight how creating a B Reactor National Historical Park would create jobs and spur tourism in southeast Washington. The B Reactor at Hanford was the world’s first full-scale plutonium production facility. Correspondent Anna King has more.

Senator Maria Cantwell believes despite its dark history, Hanford has an important lesson to share.

“There is a scientific story here about scientific accomplishment,” she says.

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Historic Ranch
6:16 am
Fri June 1, 2012

Historic Southeast Washington Ranch Goes Up For Sale

A sprawling, historic ranch in southeast Washington goes up for sale Friday. Conservationists and the state of Washington are hoping to keep the 14,000 acre property out of the hands of developers.

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UI Scholar Consultant
6:46 am
Mon May 28, 2012

University Of Idaho Scholar Is Consultant On New HBO Hemingway Film

HBO is premiering a new film Monday on the love affair between Ernest Hemingway and his third wife, journalist Martha Gellhorn. A University of Idaho Hemingway scholar served as a consultant to the filmmakers. Northwest Public Radio’s Glenn Mosley reports.

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Drake Monument
7:10 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Drake Landmark Designation Sparks Debate

Garry Gitzen stands over Oregon's Nehalem Bay, which he claims is where Sir Francis Drake spent five weeks in 1579.
Photo by Colin Fogarty Northwest News Network

Oregon and California are locked in a dispute over something that happened 433 years ago. That’s when Sir Francis Drake became the first British explorer to make contact with Native Americans. It happened on what is now the American West Coast. The question is where. Oregon or California? The National Park Service is poised to officially recognize one state’s claim and not the other’s.

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Chinese Massacre Memorial
6:19 am
Wed May 9, 2012

Chopper Delivers Memorial Marker To Massacre Site

A memorial to Chinese gold miners massacred in Hells Canyon.
Photo by Lyle Wirtanen Northwest News Network

A granite memorial arrived by helicopter Tuesday at a remote cove in Hells Canyon on the Idaho-Oregon border. The stone will mark the site where a large group of Chinese gold miners was massacred way back in 1887. Correspondent Tom Banse reports.

Private contributions paid for the engraving and transportation of the 1,100 pound granite marker. Memorial project treasurer Lyle Wirtanen says the stone was inscribed in English, Chinese and the native Nez Perce language.

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