Hanford Site

Anna King / Northwest News Network

For decades workers at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in southeast Washington have been complaining of vapors from radioactive sludge. Workers at the tank farms say the fumes give them sore throats, headaches and dizziness. Now Washington State says it intends to sue the U.S. Department of Energy in 90 days if more isn’t done to protect these workers.

Northwest News Network

You might have heard of “Hanford Downwinders.”

Now, a new book penned by a Northwest author tackles the stories of nuclear “downwinders” in the broader West. It hits the market in November. 

Sarah Aliabeth Fox found that radioactive contamination came from unexpected places. It would get onto workers’ clothes, it got in the air and it settled on crops hundreds of miles away. Crops that were served up on America’s dinner tables.

Anna King / Northwest News Network

A seven month federal investigation into the firing of a top safety manager at Hanford came up inconclusive Monday.

It was supposed to reveal what really happened in the whistleblower’s case, and if her safety concerns had merit. But the Department of Energy’s inspector general said federal contractors at southeast Washington’s nuclear reservation refused to hand over documents.

Great Beyond / Flickr

One federal agency intends to fine another up to $10,000 a week if radioactive waste isn’t cleaned up right near the Columbia River. It’s all happening at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in southeast Washington. 

So there’s this old reactor called the K-West at Hanford. And behind it is this huge concrete swimming-pool-like basin. It was built in the ‘50s and meant to last for 20 years.

The state of Washington is going back to federal court over clean-up at Hanford -- the nation’s largest nuclear waste site.

Anna King / Northwest News Network

Hanford workers who are worried about getting sick turned out by the dozens for a public meeting in Richland Wednesday. Some of the nuclear site employees say the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors aren’t doing enough to protect them from hazardous and smelly chemical vapors. Correspondent Anna King was there.

Anna King / Northwest News Network

The federal government led a bus load of journalists to points across the Hanford nuclear site. Officials wanted to show off what they’re doing to keep workers safe from chemical vapors. Since the spring a run of workers have needed medical attention from vapor exposure. Correspondent Anna King was on the bus, and files this report.

Department of Energy

Washington state and the federal government just gave themselves a 40-day deadline. They need a clear cleanup plan for leaking tanks of radioactive waste at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. If you think you’ve heard that before, it’s because you have.

Tobin Fricke / Wikimedia Commons

This week is the deadline for the state of Washington and the federal government to reach an agreement on how to clean up radioactive tank waste at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. The two sides can’t agree on a timeline. But with this week’s 40-day deadline it seems the state and the U.S. Department of Energy have very different views of where things are.

Tobin Fricke / Wikimedia Commons

The clock is ticking on the 40-day, 40-night compromise deadline between Washington state and the federal government for cleaning up Hanford’s leaking radioactive waste tanks.

But at Hanford’s annual update for the public in Richland this week, it was clear agreement between the state and the federal government is still a ways off.

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