gray wolf

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Wildlife experts from Oregon, Washington and California say wolf activity has been increasing in all three states.

Idaho biologists say the number of wolves is likely declining, but their count of breeding pairs of wolves -- a key number used to measure the health of the state’s wolf population -- has actually gone up.

Panel Finds Feds Didn't Use Best Science In Wolf Plan

Feb 7, 2014

A new independent review finds the federal government used uncertain science when it proposed taking the gray wolf off the endangered species list across the Lower 48.

US Fish And Wildlife Propose To Delist Gray Wolf

Jun 10, 2013
EarthFix

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced Friday it plans to stop protecting the gray wolf and put the states in charge of managing these predators. But the plan is already facing some tough opposition from wolf advocate groups that say it’s too early for this discussion. EarthFix reporter Aaron Kunz explains.

The US Fish and Wildlife Service wants to completely remove federal protections of gray wolves. Agency leaders announced the proposal Friday. The move would turn over gray wolf management to states. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Director Dan Ashe says gray wolves have recovered dramatically over the past decade.

"To see a species rebound from a century-long campaign of human persecution to flourish on the landscape again, is something we're all extraordinarily lucky to witness in our lifetimes,” Ashe told reporters in a conference call.

Oregon State University

A plan by the federal government to end protection for gray wolves received mixed reactions from environmental groups to ranchers. EarthFix reporter Aaron Kunz obtained a copy of that draft report and explains what it means for the Northwest.

Oregon State University

The federal government is preparing to stop protecting gray wolves in the lower 48 states, according to a draft document. The plan is drawing criticism from environmental groups. EarthFix reporter Aaron Kunz has more.


Wolf Count: Numbers Up in Oregon, Washingon; Down In Idaho

Apr 15, 2013

There are fewer wolves overall in the West, but Oregon and Washington's wolf populations continue to grow. That's according to the federal government's annual gray wolf tally, released Friday. As Jessica Robinson reports, the count has also revealed the initial effect of a controversial wolf hunting season in Idaho.

In the 2011-12 season, Idaho hunters and trappers killed nearly 400 wolves. Yet the population count decreased by just 63 animals, or 11 percent.

OLYMPIA, Wash. – It would be easier to kill gray wolves that attack livestock or pets under a bill that passed the Washington Senate Friday. Currently, ranchers and property owners can’t kill protected animals, like wolves, without the permission of the Department of Fish and Wildlife. The bill sparked heated debate in the Senate.

Republican state Sen. John Smith said the measure would allow people to defend their animals, including the dog his son loves.

Idaho Department of Fish and Game

Two new wolf packs formed in Oregon last year. That brings the state’s total to six packs. Friday the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission learned what this could mean for possibly removing endangered species protection for the wolves.

Colville Tribes OK Wolf Hunt On Reservation

Dec 27, 2012
Photo by US Fish and Wildlife Service

The Colville Confederated Tribes have authorized a wolf hunt on their reservation. Steve Jackson has more on the story.

Alpha Male Wolf In Wedge Pack Killed, Ending State Hunt

Sep 27, 2012
ForestWander / Wikimedia Commons

Washington wildlife managers say the hunt for a pack of grey wolves is over. A state marksman killed the alpha male of the pack Thursday in far northeast Washington. The department has killed a total of seven wolves from the Wedge Pack since August.

Photo by: Gunnar Ries Amphibol / Wikimedia Commons

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has re-issued the kill order for four wolves in a pack in the Northeastern corner of the state. Starting Wednesday marksmen will take to the field, Ashley Ahearn reports.

Groups Boycott 'The Grey' For Portrayal Of Wolves

Jan 26, 2012

A new Liam Neeson action thriller opening Friday is receiving howls of protest from wolf advocates. They say “The Grey” wrongly portrays wolves as massive, bloodthirsty beasts. And as Jessica Robinson reports, some wildlife groups are organizing a boycott.

When a plane crash strands a scruffy bunch of guys in the wilds of Alaska, they find themselves going mano a mano against some very mean looking wolves.