government shutdown

Amy Radil / KUOW

Democratic Senator Patty Murray visited a Planned Parenthood clinic in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood today.

She says Republican attempts to de-fund the organization could lead to a government shutdown.

Austin Jenkins / Northwest News Network

With a third special session underway, the Washington House and Senate plan to vote sometime Monday on a two-year budget. A vote on a gas tax package is also possible this week. It follows a whirlwind weekend of negotiations.

Washington lawmakers still have time to get a budget deal and avert a partial government shutdown July 1.


Washington state lawmakers have until next week to pin down a budget. If they don’t, parts of state government will shut down. In the midst of a drought, that could have ramifications for farmers and for fish.

This year’s drought is affecting Washington in all kinds of ways. It’s even threatening to make a potential government shutdown even more painful. That would happen on July 1 unless a budget agreement is reached.

The state of Washington has sent email alerts to 26,000 state employees notifying them of temporary layoff.

Washington House Democrats are moving forward with a plan to eliminate several tax exemptions, but they don’t yet have buy-in from Senate Republicans.

Washington lawmakers have until the 30-day special session runs out on June 27 to reach a budget deal. If they fail to do so, a partial government shutdown would begin on July 1.

There’s still no budget deal in Olympia, but Washington House Democrats said Friday they’re willing to drop their push for a state capital gains tax.

If Washington lawmakers don’t have a budget by the end of the month, state government will shut down. But it would only be a partial shutdown.

It’s not just Washington state agencies that are preparing for a possible government shutdown on July 1. Washington House and Senate administrators will meet Wednesday to discuss contingency planning.