Global Warming

The window of opportunity to prevent grave ecological damage to our oceans from climate change is closing. That's according to a paper appearing Friday in the journal Science.

Patrick M / flickr

Changing wind patterns are to blame for warming temperatures in the Northwest, according to the study. Climatologist James Johnstone was the lead author, and he says, "Basically all of the warming in the Northeast Pacific ocean has been wind driven."

In 2008, as scientists documented a record melt in the Arctic ice and Al Gore's film An Inconvenient Truth was in theaters, a half dozen major investment houses launched mutual funds designed to take advantage of financial opportunities offered by climate change.

Rachael McDonald / KLCC

Two young Eugene women had their day in court Thursday in a lawsuit asking the state of Oregon to do more to prevent climate change. A three judge panel of the Oregon Court of Appeals heard arguments at the University of Oregon Law School in Eugene.

Leaking tailpipes and wood-fired stoves are some of the culprits that release methane and soot into the atmosphere. Some researchers think cutting these emissions could significantly reduce global warming effects. But a Northwest study has found that it might not reduce effects that much.

Photo courtesy National Parks Service

Redwoods grow where heavy fog rolls in from the Pacific. From Big Sur, California to Brookings, Oregon. Scientists don’t have a clear picture of how climate change will affect that coastal fog, and the giants that depend on it. But a group called Archangel Ancient Tree Archive has come up with an unusual plan to help the redwoods. It’s planting clones of some of the world’s largest trees. Amelia Templeton of EarthFix reports.

University of Oregon researchers say they have found a way to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from coal-burning plants by more than 90 percent. Their formula uses refrigeration to capture and control the dangerous chemicals pumped out of smoke stacks.

A study released Monday by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences indicates that some mammals might be unable to keep up with environmental changes. Aaron Kunz explains what that means for the Pacific Northwest.

The study looked at nearly 500 species in North and South America. It determined that close to 10 percent will not be able change habitat in order to keep pace with climate change.

Rock Doc: Our Daily Bread In 2050

Apr 26, 2012
Washington State University

One of my habits in recent years has been studying climate history in my free time. What can I say; it keeps me out of bars.

Recently, I was startled to learn that the temperatures experienced by American wheat farms back in the 1830s were almost 7 degrees warmer than they now are.

SEATTLE - Washington’s King County has released a detailed report that tallies up the total amount of Greenhouse Gases it emitted in 2008.

These emissions come from homes, industry, transportation – and our personal shopping decisions. And they are changing the global climate.